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Like Nitrogen in the tires, putting clutch slave cylinders INSIDE the transmission bell housing is another one of those changes that ONLY makes sense for the race track and not in general passenger vehicles.
 

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.My air compressor gives me a free product that is 78% nitrogen, so that has to be good enough for me. My routine is to replace any tire with a DOT date code over 8 years old; though I have gone as high as 11 years, with a pair of back tires that were still in balance and had a nice even tread-wear pattern. .
 

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I've heard different accounts of how the nitrogen fill became a fad. It appears to be due to the fact that race cars used it. But the reason they used it was because air compressors weren't allowed, or were too awkward or space consuming in the pits. It was expedient to simply have a cylinder of inert gas such as Nitrogen to fill tires.

It does indeed appear that Nitrogen seeps through rubber more slowly than Oxygen, but it is still a very slow process which shouldn't lead to much loss of pressure between pressure checks. And as the oxygen seeps out, the concentration of nitrogen in any tire must increase. So as a tire is topped up over its life span, it will approach more and more closely a pure Nitrogen fill (ignoring the 1% Argon present in the original air fill).
 

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putting clutch slave cylinders INSIDE the transmission bell housing is another one of those changes
ya yes, the ford engineers were never that smart for the most part. they figured it was a serviceable item and SHOULD last as long as the clutch...
 

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SHOULD last as long as the clutch
On the race track where the clutch pedal is barely ever held-in, they're right. 😅
Many of the changes made in passenger vehicles were born and vetted on the track.
Sometimes they just go a little too far.
 

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So many people just don’t know how to drive in the snow. ABS and all season tries don’t help either. Got to love when abs kicks in and you slide over the snow due to worn all season tires lol.
 

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Thanks for sharing ZZ. That's informative. EVERYONE (not just the people loosing control) appears to be pressuring one-another to travel too fast for the conditions. I've been there... and after watching that, will keep in mind that I shouldn't let those around me pressure me into driving too fast for the conditions. But at the same time one doesn't want to travel so slow as to be a hazard - I've witnessed that too. When I had worn the tread to the point of no greater than 55MPH in the rain I just kept my azz off the frig'n highway until I had time the following week to swap'em out.

......... The vehicles in my house all have a set of four winter tires.
My Fiesta ST came with Summer tires. So I was kind of forced into buying dedicated Winter tires for the first time. OMG even without studs they are LEAPS ahead of even the few that can be considered better all-season tires. I've read the posts of some other Fiesta ST owners who decided to test the Summer tires under snowy conditions... yeah, they may as well have been skis... no exaggeration. 😅 They all said they turned around as best they could and headed straight back home in short order. We're in valley terrain... wasn't even about to entertain that notion.


So many people just don’t know how to drive in the snow. ABS and all season tries don’t help either. Got to love when abs kicks in and you slide over the snow due to worn all season tires lol.
I expected that to be some place like Texas where drivers are relatively inexperienced. But MINNESOTA WTH!?
 

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Having a bit of experience driving in snow and ice, my technique now is to simply stay off the highway in bad conditions.

You hear about steering into a skid, etc. but I have found that you will be driving along apparently fine, then the car starts sliding a bit. This quickly worsens until you are sliding sideways or backwards down the road, hopefully halting without too much damage in the snow drifts off the shoulder or ditch.
 

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@Joey_Twowagons - That's what I like about tighter suspensions that let you feel the road. The instant you break traction, you know it... if paying attention. The softer suspensions often lead to overconfidence. By the time people even realize they've lost traction, it's nearly too late. But I understand some have back issues and what not. (know two folks with military backgrounds that have back issues)
 

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It's always been too late for me, at least on icy roads. On gravel or merely wet roads I'm usually okay with a bit of sliding, although with my old Cadillac the soft suspension made it pretty hard to control (as in hopelessly out of control), as you mentioned.
 

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So the "ST-Line" models are the non-performance versions of the ST (sport tuned) models.

In other words, they just have the body kit and possibly wheels; none of the engine/transmission/suspension/braking changes.

Some of the Fiesta ST forum goers have said Ford came out with the ST-Line versions of the Fiesta in order to use left over body parts. But to me, it was clear from some of the buyers in prior years that there would be a demand for Fiesta ST styling, minus the performance aspects of the normal ST. There were some folks saying they wanted a cushy ride, some folks saying they didn't want it lowered, some saying they wanted better mileage, some saying they wanted lower highway RPMs, some saying the braking was too touchy, suspension too tight, etcetera. When all that was added up, it was clear that the only thing some of the people bought it for, was the styling and not the acceleration/braking/cornering performance.
 
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