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with my escort in mind: realizing the suspension is rather impractacle for ohio winters and the slow-but-ever expanding rust problem, about three weeks ago, i bought myself a second car ('91 S-10), so i could winterize the escort.

which brings me to my question:

i have a pretty good idea on what i need to do to winterize my escort and keep out of harm's way:

-keep the tires off the cold concrete (im going to use my old rims for that)
-put dry gas in the tank and run engine once a week minimal
-car cover
-talk to insurance agent and change policy on escort
-wash & wax prior to storage

but does anyone else have any other suggestions, anything im missing?
 

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A heated garage or storage area is always nice, not always affordable, but good!!! I personally would find somewhere to do a slight bit of driving as to make sure that nothing seizes. Ummmmmm, other than that, I'm not quite sure, never winterized a car, but I should read this post too, cause I'm gonna be usin my Grand Prix for the winter!
 

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Maybe I'm weird but I like my scort in the winter, and I'm in michigan. I might just not know anything else since I've never had a different car. It always seems to handle the snow good, plows right thru it. I use my lower gears (automatic) a lot when it gets really bad out. Not sayin ya'll should use your scorts in the winter if you have an option you like better. I don't have another option, but I'm happy to drive it in the snow. Am I weird lol?
 

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Ha ha, Kim's just like I am. I can't count the nuber of days I was scraping frame on snow and busting through drifts higher than my hood on the way to work :p

These little cars are great in the winter if you know how to drive them :wink:

Matt 8)
 

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Nah... I suppose... I love my car in the winter; it's the only time the e-brake does anything. I can do slides in the snow without hurting stuff, or slide back and forth... and... I could do that in any car. But it handles itself just fine.
 

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Slinger du Death:

Regarding winterization, aside from the things you mentioned:

1. Run your A/C once per month for several minutes to keep the seals lubricated and supple.
2. Definitely add fuel stabilizer. Add it just before filling the gas tank to ensure it mixes well. I think you add 15 mL to every litre. It will ensure that the gas doesn't goo up on you.
3. Charge your battery once per month. I'd do this even if you plan to run the car once per week for a few minutes. In fact, if I were you, I'd remove the battery. In Ohio, you may still see cold enough temperatures that this would be prudent, especially if you can't guarantee you'll run it regularly.
4. Check that your coolant strength is adequate before you put the car away.
5. Change your oil (go to 5W30) just before you put the beast away.

I do NOT like the idea of heated storage. Heat accelerates corrosion, especially since you live where relative humidity is pretty high. If you're going to work on your vehicle during the winter, I'd agree to go with heat; otherwise no.

This being said, I don't see the value in winterizing an Escort. Also, I'm not sure insurance companies give you a break any more if you claim to not drive a car during the winter.
 

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I love my escort for driving in the winter also, but I would like it to stay clean and rust free, plus with the idiots driving around here, I'd rather them hitting me in the car that I care less about - not to mention the car is much larger with a better impact rating. As for insurance, depending on age and stuff, by parking my escort for the winter, I can save over $100 a month, because I only have to pay for fire and theft, plus I get the first month free of that (it only costs me like $15 a month total though).
 

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Yea having a larger car for accident purposes could prove to be good. Course I know there's the roll over factor in some cases, but still I do feel a lil valnerable in the scort sometimes. Course I think the scort's small size has saved my life and driving record a few times. I have an air bag but I'm not sure it works or if I want it to work LOL! Being 10yrs old I dunno what will come outta there! A few times the air bag light came on blinking, but if I turned the car off and back on it was gone. The light hasn't come back on since I replaced the alternator. Any advice on checking out the air bag?

This one time thou this girl who had just gotten her license pulled out in front of me. I was freaked cuz I knew I didn't have time to stop. Plus she did the classic deer in headlights thing and just stopped in front of me. I hit her and I was so sure I would get out and find my car messed up. Nope nothing damaged. I hit her wheel and bounced off. I broke her axel but I drove home like nothin happened. It was crazy, I couldn't believe it. Go scort! LOL :) How do scorts usually rate for accidents?
 

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depends what your hitting! LOL! My friend had an old GT, hit a deer, flipped the car, still managed to drive it (untill police saw him and charged him for leaving the scene of an accident!!!!) but it was still a write off, but he was left unscratched! I perfonally would say against larger vehicles you're screwed, with them being lover to the ground your likely to be crushed, but with a car of equal size, I'd say it's kinda iffy - for example we all saw the pics of when a mustang meets the rear end of an escort - leads me to believe that it wouldn't to to well!
 

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In the general part check out "The WhiteKnight Has Fallen" you'll see what I'm talking about! Poor guy though, danm people that can't drive their sports cars!
 

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highanddry said:
Slinger du Death:

I do NOT like the idea of heated storage. Heat accelerates corrosion, especially since you live where relative humidity is pretty high. If you're going to work on your vehicle during the winter, I'd agree to go with heat; otherwise no.
How does heat accelerate corrosion?

Last I knew it was humidity that did it. And when your out in the garage with the heater running, the heater does not add to the humidity unless you have a humidifier built into your furnace. And even if you did have that kind of option I doubt you could get the humidity high enough where it would make a difference.
 

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Corrosion is a chemical process; one like most, that is accelerated by elevated temperature. This is pure fact. Go read about the oxidation of iron if you want.

Don't embarass yourself with your ignorance.

Thanks for helping out with his question.
 

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highanddry said:
Corrosion is a chemical process; one like most, that is accelerated by elevated temperature. This is pure fact. Go read about the oxidation of iron if you want.

Don't embarass yourself with your ignorance.

Thanks for helping out with his question.
Ignorant? Not here.

While you work on your car in the cold I'll work on mine in a heated garage. Keeping my garage between 60-70 degrees in the winter months, and you working in cold because your worried about rust, now thats ignorant.

Since you seem to know so much, what temp is ideal for me to store my cars in? And I probley shouldnt have them outside during the hot summer months because with the heat index usually in the 90's, (hotter than what most people have in there heated garages) and that would make it more prone to rust.
 

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ALOW1 said:
Ignorant? Not here.

And I probley shouldnt have them outside
Iggnurint? I probley a'int iggnurint, ya sloon-swaggr'n '*****! *grabs shotgun in one arm, his sister in the other*

Temperature increases rate of oxidation. Period. Highanddry's right. However, he's also an a-hole like me.

Does heat increase the rate of oxidation? Yes, it does. For all intents and purposes, everything from freezing to 130 degrees -all else being equal- won't really make a damn bit of difference. What's the ideal temperature to store your cars at? Well, I dunno about the rest of the fluids in your engine and such, but as far at the body is concerned, 0 Kelvin would be the theoretical ideal temperature for minimizing iron oxidation. Period. And if you disagree, you're wrong.

If you still don't believe me, go grab some steel wool and fry it up under a torch for a few minutes. Let me know what happens.
 

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and oh yeah- winterizing the car: are you trying to STORE it for the winter, or just get it ready to drive in winter weather?
 

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ooo LOL! Come on we'll drive our scorts and meet halfway lol I'll be in the one that looks just like yours. hhmmm I wonder if my fiance would mind? Yea probably...darn lol.

What does 94 3000GT mean?
 

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siragan said:
ALOW1 said:
Ignorant? Not here.

And I probley shouldnt have them outside
Iggnurint? I probley a'int iggnurint, ya sloon-swaggr'n '*****! *grabs shotgun in one arm, his sister in the other*

Temperature increases rate of oxidation. Period. Highanddry's right. However, he's also an a-hole like me.

Does heat increase the rate of oxidation? Yes, it does. For all intents and purposes, everything from freezing to 130 degrees -all else being equal- won't really make a damn bit of difference. What's the ideal temperature to store your cars at? Well, I dunno about the rest of the fluids in your engine and such, but as far at the body is concerned, 0 Kelvin would be the theoretical ideal temperature for minimizing iron oxidation. Period. And if you disagree, you're wrong.

If you still don't believe me, go grab some steel wool and fry it up under a torch for a few minutes. Let me know what happens.
I guess I should of stated my first post alittle better for some of you to understand. I guess some people here go to the extremes when it comes to heating. Its my understanding that rust can be speeded up under extreme temps. My garage is heated, I prefer it that way and I feel it is better for my cars.

Were all allowed to have our own opinions on things. I prefer to have my cars in the heat where I dont worry about things like plastic being exposed to cold and cracking. And I like to work comfortably when I am working on something. And some people prefer to have theres in the cold so they dont rust which would be so mild you probley wouldnt ever notice it.

Then again theres no rust on anything in my garage as far as body panels and things go so I never really thought a whole lot about the issue. Either way I love a good argument now and then on a forum, without alittle bit of rudeness here and there it makes for a boring site. 8)
 
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