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These compromises often give you lots of room for improvement in terms of performance! There are many different ways to create more horsepower from a stock engine. Here are several examples (generally in order from least to most difficult/expensive):

­1.)Change your computer chip. Sometime­s, but certainly not always, you can change a car's performance by changing the ROM chip in the engine control unit (ECU). You usually buy these chips from aftermarket performance dealers. It is valuable to read an independent review of the chip you are contemplating, because some chips are all hype and no performance.

2.)Let air come in more easily. As a piston moves down in the intake stroke, air resistance can rob power from the engine. Some newer cars are using polished intake manifolds to eliminate air resistance there. Bigger air filters and reduced intake piping can also improve air flow.

­3.)Let exhaust exit more easily. If air resistance or back-pressure makes it hard for exhaust to exit a cylinder, it robs the engine of power. If the exhaust pipe is too small or the muffler has a lot of air resistance then this can cause back-pressure. High-performance exhaust systems use headers, big tail pipes and free-flowing mufflers to eliminate back-pressure in the exhaust system.

4.)Change the heads and cams. Many stock engines have one intake valve and one exhaust valve. Buying a new head that has four valves per cylinder will dramatically improve airflow in and out of the engine and this can improve power. Using performance cams can also make a big difference.­
 

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Dude, you really need to start reading. There are stickies at the top of this section that will have answers to all 59 of your other posts. Is there a question for this post by the way, looks like all you did was copy/paste a bunch of stuff. Sorry to sound harsh, but damn, you could have just expanded one thread instead of making 17 different ones.


Welcome to the club!!!!!
Rudy.
 

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It's not negative feedback, but what you posted is already well known generic engine stuff. Some of it is also a bit biased. Almost all of us here have torn down a CVH engine or two, and have modified them in one way or another. There are even a couple who can work around the innards of the transaxles.

I understand your desire to post, and share knowledge. This is a good thing. However, I really suggest reading the stickies, or reading them again, if you've done so, to make sure you're getting some knowledge from people with firsthand experience. Yes, we're all still learning, and I doubt anyone will be a 100% hardcore CVH master mechanic, who can quote every spec of each piece, for every year.

Although we are still learning, we're pretty familiar with our cars, how to make them run well, and how to modify them. That said, what was posted originally mostly doesn't apply to 1st gen Escorts.

1. Our ECU is not capable of being reprogrammed unless sent to Ford, or another company, who does the programming. That is not only expensive, but it won't give a very good upgrade.

2. Ported and polished heads, as well as big air filters, do less for the car than increasing compression, boring, or even properly balancing things. I know it's a popular thing to do, but unless you're racing, or going for every hp you can wring out of a cylinder, p&p is mostly a love affair thing.

3. The stock 2" exhaust is plenty big for minor mods and performance increases. Almost the first mod I've seen people do is try to put on a huge muffler or exhaust, when it will give minimal gains on these cars at best.

4. This made me chuckle. Technically yes 4 valves per cylinder will increase airflow, but a CVH is one of the best flowing 2 valve designs I've seen. It has huge valves. The exhaust valve on them in about the size of a Chevy 305 ci engine....yet it's less than half the size. The heads are not the problem so much as the small ports they're given. However, porting these (if so desired) will make improvements, especially when using forced induction. Plus...there is no aftermarket support or 4 valve heads for these engines, unless you count the "reverse ZVH" with modified oiling system and such, where a Zetec head is fitting to the CVH block. For the trouble, just go with a Zetec.
 

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UnexplodedCow said:
4. This made me chuckle. Technically yes 4 valves per cylinder will increase airflow, but a CVH is one of the best flowing 2 valve designs I've seen. It has huge valves. The exhaust valve on them in about the size of a Chevy 305 ci engine....yet it's less than half the size. The heads are not the problem so much as the small ports they're given. However, porting these (if so desired) will make improvements, especially when using forced induction. Plus...there is no aftermarket support or 4 valve heads for these engines, unless you count the "reverse ZVH" with modified oiling system and such, where a Zetec head is fitting to the CVH block. For the trouble, just go with a Zetec.
This is so true about the CVH. You know I spend way to much time hanging out in UK Escort forums. Time and time again I've seen lots of guys that have put in 2.0l Zetec's just to ripe them out and go back to the CVH. Well said.

The only down side is the design of the exhaust port. If it was raised a little the thing would flow like crazy.
 

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Radius the inner edge and it will still flow pretty well. That first corner right after the valve seems to be the real restriction. It can't be all that bad, however, since modern 427 heads have the D exhaust ports relatively low...and they flow well.
 
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