What should I do to my LX while I have the transmission dropped | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)
  1. Wash your hands and do not touch your face, keep it safe and clean. Long live Feoa!

What should I do to my LX while I have the transmission dropped

Discussion in 'Drivetrains' started by Paul A., Apr 19, 2020.

  1. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Hello,

    I have posted on here for a couple of transmission questions. I have a 93 lx with a dying 5 speed. I have though long and hard if I want to keep a car that I only spent $500 on. I decided to. It was just too decent of a car to junk. No rust, cold AC, runs ok (won't pass smog though), and I purchased tires as well as a couple other things. I managed to find and pull myself another 5 speed from a 94 lx. Same engine and all that. I got it with a 7 month warranty if it fails I can go pull another one. My question to you all is, when I get the transmission dropped is there anything you guys would recommend I address while everything is apart? The car was extremely neglected before I had it. Of course the clutch and my ragged suspension is going to be delt with. I'm still on the fence about the slave cylinder. Is there anything else you recommend? And tips for the transmission itself? The shaft didn't have any play, and everything seemed acceptable when we put in gear and turned both of the wheels (before we removed it). Pulled the spedo sensor and didn't see any shavings nor did it smell toasted. The car I got it from wasn't wrecked, but it had signs of engine failure (hopefully anyhow). Most of the parts I've yanked from it in the past have been operational so far.


    Thanks,

    Paul
  2. Swift

    Swift FEOA Donator

    Messages:
    526
    Likes Received:
    111
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Clutch, pressure plate, throw out bearing, pilot bearing, and main seal.
    88ESCORTV6 and zzyzzx like this.
  3. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,125
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Trophy Points:
    563
    Location:
    south TX or northern VA
    The above items certainly, plus the clutch slave cylinder and the clutch master cylinder. I would add that I would want to repace the bushings in the shifter rod that runs back to the shift lever, and to ensure the Vehicle Speed Sensor is free to be wiggled up and out. That is the only way to check the fluid level in a 2nd gen 5-speed.

    Im curious what is wrong with the 5-speed that is in the car now? Have you checked the fluid level in that one?
    Joey_Twowagons likes this.
  4. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

    Messages:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Trophy Points:
    413
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Ditto on the fluid level. I had a transmission that started to pop out of high gear, then would not stay in high gear at all, on a long highway trip last year.
    It turned out to be out of fluid, after I added ATF it worked fine.

    Also ditto on replacing the rear main seal. I haven't replaced my leaking one yet, so I don't know if the flywheel bolts need sealer on them. If so, then clean and re-seal them.
    zzyzzx likes this.
  5. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Thats for the advice on the cylinders. I was definently on the fence before about replacing them. When I yanked the transmission I got the speed sensor with it as well as all the wiring pig tails of which do any of you guys know the functions of in a manual transmission? I also got the complete linkage assembly as mine is broken. The shifter falls out of the floor and is currently being held in by a couple of self tapping screws.

    The original one lost 5th gear not too long after I got the car. I was on my way to Santa Fe from Albuquerque and lost it going up La Bajada hill which is about a mile or two of very steep highway. It has a bad rap for killing vehicles, especially old or under-powered ones. Ever since its been down hill for the transmission. It leaks where the pieces of it go together and is starting to have issues with 2nd gear and reverse. Reverse is very hard to get into sometimes and it sometimes grinds. 2nd is starting to go the same way. Troubleshot the linkage and fluid levels but was neither. As a last resort I had a transmission shop hoping I was just missing something, but they essentially told me what I had already discovered.

    If its leaking no oil, should I not worry about the rear main or just do it? I was reading another thread on here where they mentioned carefully prying the old one out and putting the new one in by tapping on it with a mallot and 2x4. If its that easy I couldn't go wrong doing it right?

    Thanks,

    Paul.
    zzyzzx likes this.
  6. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
  7. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Question for you guys, there isn't a gasket that goes between the engine and transmission is there? Just the rear main seal and the seal for the transmission shaft right? I found no such thing on any of the part sites. My other vehicle had a gasket, but its auto and not a Ford. Figured I should double check before I mess it up.

    Thanks,

    Paul
  8. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,125
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Trophy Points:
    563
    Location:
    south TX or northern VA
    The standard thing is a thin steel shim, on the auto snd the manual trans.
  9. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    What would be the official name for that part? I should probably a new one up before I take the car apart.
  10. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,125
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Trophy Points:
    563
    Location:
    south TX or northern VA
    I dont recall having seen it mentioned in the Ford Service Manual. Each of my Escorts were already non-running when I bought them, and trans or engine repair was necessary. And in each case they had that steel plate. Sometimes prying the trans away from the engine block twisted that plate. I simply hammered it back flat before re-assembly.

    Something to be careful of; there are two steel dowels that 'locate' the block to engine precisely, one of the front of the block, the other on the back side. These are hollow and of a specific shape - and they may stick to the block, or two the trans bell housing as you pry them apart. They are not easy to find (auto parts stores are no help at all) and getting a pair from the junkyard is not easy either; you get them after the engine and trans have been separated an inch or more.
  11. Swift

    Swift FEOA Donator

    Messages:
    526
    Likes Received:
    111
    Trophy Points:
    293
    The metal shim, is just a spacer
    No need to get a new one.
  12. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Sweet. I appreciate all your help. I'm biting at the bullet to get this started I will have to put a before and after photo of everything.
  13. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

    Messages:
    2,557
    Likes Received:
    612
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Just in case you don't have this. Hopefully it'll be of some use.

    http://www.mazdaspd.com/resources/Transmission_Rebuild.pdf

    https://www.king6fab.com/how-to-technical-help/how-to-tech/g-series-5-speed-transmission/


    (Fast forward to 9:55. Previous shows him actually removing the trans from the car but is just an overview and not really a step by step)

    John
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2020
    zzyzzx and Paul A. like this.
  14. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

    Messages:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Trophy Points:
    413
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    It's commonly called a block plate, or engine plate.
    zzyzzx and Paul A. like this.
  15. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    That video was actually very informational. I was planning on trying to rebuild the original one that I will be pulling out of the car. I would rather have a fresh one than go back to the junkyard for another old one when it inevitably dies. Also what fluid are you running in your transmissions? I have the ATF it calls for, but have read a couple places that some people prefer using gear oil.

    Theres some cars at the junkyard with seemingly intact engines (they were wrecked so I'm assuming they had to be running). I've been debating rebuilding the old transmission and finding a decent motor to rebuild before the car kicks the bucket. That way once the inevitable happens I can start everything from square one again.

    Also my parts came last night in the mail. I was very surprised by Rock Auto. I have read a bunch of places on here that it is a good place for parts. I got the cheapest versions of everything I could find on the site, and was pleasantly surprised by Carquest auto parts showing up at my door. Everything was name brand, just in exceedingly old packaging. I was expecting it to be super cheap like the lower end stuff you find at Pep Boys or whatever.
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2020
  16. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    I forgot to mention on my reply. You say there are 2 metal dowels. Are they just to properly position the engine and transmission when you put them together?
  17. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

    Messages:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Trophy Points:
    413
    Location:
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Yes, those dowels are to keep the engine and transmission in precise alignment.
    The transmission input shaft has to be in line with the crankshaft within a few thousandths of an inch, or there will be excessive stresses and rapid wear. The bolts have a little bit of clearance around them, they don't perform an aligning function, but simply clamp the pieces together.
  18. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Thats good to know. I completely missed the dowels when I yanked the one at the junkyard. I will have to pay attention for them when I do it for real on my car. I know dumb question but is everything technically supposed to be torqued down, or will my cordless impact suffice? So far on mine and the doner car, everything has been crazy lose.
  19. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    10,125
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Trophy Points:
    563
    Location:
    south TX or northern VA
    I have the Ford Service Manual for each of my Escorts (91,92,93,94,95),; got each of them cheap from ebay; and use a torque wrench for most anything threading into the block or the head and all internals engine bolts (con rods, bearing caps), as well as anything where a steel bolt is threaded into an aluminum hole - such as the serpentine belt tensioner. For lots of cases, the bolt size (such as an M-8 or an M10) will get the same torque everywhere it is used. An M8 would get 17-22 ft lbs, the M10 40-59 ft-lbs for instance.
    I have a vintage electric Intersoll-Rand impact wrench, with no way to tell how tight it is making things - so I avoid using it much. It does take off lug nuts on the wheels, but I dont use it for tightening them up.

    There is a bolt going into the crankshaft that holds the crankshaft/vib-damper on. It takes a 19mm socket, and has a torque spec of 81-96. Like spark plugs, I think it gets commonly overtightened. I have taken 1.9L engines apart where that bolt took way too much to loosen it, like well over 100 ft-lbs. I guessed that someone used an air-impact wrench to tighten the bolt. I used a torque wrench to tighten it on each engine, (which involves the trouble of keeping the engine from turning), then marked one of the hex tips on the bolt, with a matching mark on the vib damper part itself (not on the washer of course). That way I can loosen and retighten the bolt later on using my electric impact wrench.** I just tighten it till the marks are again lined up. This only works once you have set the bolt to the correct torque and match-marked it. My electric impact will just barely tighten the bolt to the right place. (Its an antique electric impact wrench).
    ** And the usual reason for removing that 19mm bolt later, is when changing to a new timing belt.
    The CV axle hub nuts also get over-tightened I think. The spec is for 174-235 ft-lbs, which would just be me standing on the end of a lever about 12-15" long on the socket. Luckily these seem hard to screwup.

    I am fond of cleaning threads out with a tap, and putting some antiseize on the bolt threads before putting it back in. This will prevent any future galling of the aluminum threads.
    zzyzzx likes this.
  20. Paul A.

    Paul A. FEOA Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    New Mexico
    Thats not a bad idea to run a tap down the threads. I have had problems on other cars with the threads being messed up. Probably not having the correct tools at the time had something to do with it. I brough my cordless impact from work and borrowed a pnumatic one. Hopefully they will get the job done. I didn't seem like anything was in particularly tight spots (at least not like my Impala) when disassembling at the junkyard. I picked up a Hanes manual at Napa. It seems to have all the basic information, although I was expecting more to be honest.

Share This Page