Weber 32/36 on a first gen? | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Weber 32/36 on a first gen?

Discussion in '1st Gen 1981-1990 CVH' started by austin86, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. austin86

    austin86 That nut who spends way to much on a escort.

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    After doing some looking I found that the stock carb on a 1.9l is a offshoot of a Weber 26/27 or Weber 32/34, Not sure witch.
    This has me wondering has anyone tried a Weber 32/36 on a 1.9l? It looks like the same bolt pattern and everything and form what I know its a much better carb.
  2. 88ESCORTV6

    88ESCORTV6 The Alpha Of The Omega

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    well well well. if you really looking for performance get your self a intake cut the runners off and fabricate a adapter to install 4 carbs off a GSXR 1100 race bike. I had this setup in 1990 and it performed great and sounded like nothing else.

    I have not tried the weber since they are very expensive none can be found for under 300$ CND


    if you go with the GSX-R carbs and tune them real good you won't regret it.
    1982 EXPert and austin86 like this.
  3. austin86

    austin86 That nut who spends way to much on a escort.

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    Well, that is a grate idea and I thought about something like that.
    But given my welding skills if I made a custom intake it would look like crap. I really want to car to look nice as it will be both for show and go. And just not all go.
    I'll likely do something like you suggested on my rusty 87.
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
  4. claych

    claych FEOA Member

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    Austin86
    Holley/Weber on a 1.9L --- ???
    No.
  5. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    It should work... you will probably delete a few OEM wires and hoses. You might have to make up your own throttle linkage and fuel line since OEM carbs often had these in different locations.

    I recently put one of these carbs on my old B2200 pickup and it runs great after a bit of tuning, as it was a used carb.
    austin86 likes this.
  6. austin86

    austin86 That nut who spends way to much on a escort.

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    That was my thought, adding porting the manifold to fit the bigger ports in a Weber 32/26 or 38.
    If I don't end up putting the super charger on my car I may end up getting a Weber 40mm intake from the UK or making something out of the pile of HO intakes I have.
  7. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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  8. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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  9. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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  10. austin86

    austin86 That nut who spends way to much on a escort.

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    So basically it fits as long at you dill out the bolt holes in the crab? Sounds good to me. I'll have to nab one a weber then.
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  11. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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  12. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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  13. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    What's with all the embedded videos?

    Don't you guys know I can't view them at work!?
    :confused:
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  14. ricksgt

    ricksgt MY 1989 Ford Escort Terlingua GT .

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    Get back to work ,, lol,, wait until you get home to watch . ;)
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  15. austin86

    austin86 That nut who spends way to much on a escort.

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    I second this
  16. claych

    claych FEOA Member

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    Well,
    With all due respects to F.E.O.A. (forum)---
    I humbly apologize for My contextual indescretion.
    Let Me 'rephrase'...
    I am unaware of an Weber/Holley carburetor on any 1.9 L Global Factory Build...

    austin86???
    More more information on the magical mystical 1.9 carburator equipped platforms
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
  17. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    Weber DGAF (similar to 32/36) carbs were used on English Escorts. These had 1.6 engines, but were the same basic CVH engine as used in North America.

    There was an intake manifold made by Redline (K458) to fit two Weber IDF carbs on US Escorts back in the '80s.
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  18. 1982 EXPert

    1982 EXPert FEOA Member

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    Factory North American Carbs are as follows:

    Base 1.6: Weber license 32/32
    HO 1.6: Weber license 32/34
    Carb 1.9: Weber license 32/34

    Weber made a 32/36 as seen in the WatchJRgo videos linked above, but takes some work making linkage work and jetting it right.

    Jetting between the stock carbs is pretty important, the jet sizes vary a lot between each factory carb so if you replace any carb you'll want to use some good judgement on which jets to use with your build.

    I've made a video comparing all of the factory carbs:


    Performance wise I haven't been able to compare them on an engine yet but I will this spring/summer, I don't think any will make noticeable difference. They only allow more air once the secondary opens up and it's just not much more air flow between the 32 & 34, or even the 36 for that matter.

    WatchJRgo's performance gains might have just come from the bigger cam he put in and having a better air box - the stock one is terribly restrictive and doesn't attract cold air.
    I can't seem to find that Weber 32/36 anywhere now (besides ones for other engines) but I'd love to pop it open and compare to the factory carbs......

    The standard ones can't be too bad if Jack Roush was able to get 180hp though a modified one with a factory cam and 8psi of boost. Apparently it supplied fuel sufficiently up to 15psi and 7,000rpm.

    But bike carbs are so much better!
  19. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    I'm pretty sure what you are calling the jets on the carbs in the video are the air bleeds, Weber calls them "air corrector jets". They supply air to the emulsifier tubes under them, which mixes with gasoline from the main jets so that an emulsified mixture is fed to the inner (auxiliary) venturii.

    The (fuel) jets will be near the bottom of the float bowl.
    Those carbs look a fair bit different from the Webers, but presumably are based on them.

    I'm surprised you are having difficulty finding a genuine aftermarket Weber carb. A word of caution however, the internet says that there are some fakes out there, with mixed reviews.

    You may find this a useful reference for studying up on these carbs:

    Weber carb, Brown and Sharpe #13 grinder 025.JPG

    I just noticed that it says "Up to 1979", but I don't imagine that Weber did a lot of carb development after 1980.

    Important: Make notes of numbers and locations of all the jets, air bleeds etc. from each carb before doing any changing. It will be extremely difficult, if not impossible to get any of the carbs running right if these small parts get randomized, even by a carburetor expert.
  20. 1982 EXPert

    1982 EXPert FEOA Member

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    Weber was making/updating carbs until the mid 80s, there are a bunch of twin duals (like what's on that cover) that can be adapted to CVHs with the right manifold, some are side-draft and some are down draft.
    But the factory carbs are an 81-86 design that no other car seems to have, I know the Euro CVHs had nothing like them.

    I'm not too interested in switching to real Webers because I can't find the right 32/36 anywhere and the twin duals are outdated when bike carbs are easier to service, tune, offer better fuel economy, and debatably better performance.
    But I can say avoid the twin 40s, they're too big for any non-serious race engine and even those seem to prefer the 38s (I think that's the next size down). Just know that 36-39 CFM is about what most 1.6-1.9 CVHs take which roughly translates to 36-39mm throats.

    The 2 mains have the "air corrector jets" the secondaries do not. I spend everyday with carbed motors (I own a powersports shop) but these Weber-licensed Fords are rather interesting, I haven't spent much time figuring out exactly how the mains work but I think the top oriphis is just exposed to atmosphere (pressure) air or is closed off to allow for a vacuum but i'm leaning towards open atmospheric pressure which helps meter the amount of fuel traveling out of the main when the butterfly opens up and allows siphoning from the main jets.
    If I remember right the nozzles at the end of the main tubes pickup fuel and the oriphises halfway up the main tube let the fuel into the inner/fuel venturi.
    No other jets in the carb utilize air in that manner, I believe they all just have the traditional role of limiting how much fuel is siphoned through their own jet outlets along the venturi walls.

    I included all the jet sizes in my video's description but I forgot to write down the nozzle sizes...... My 1.9 carb oddly didn't have very many sizes printed on the parts, maybe I can measure them out someday.
    I always keep track of which goes where, yeah if you mix them up you can probably kiss your economy and performance goodbye lol
    Luckily these are hard to mess up if you keep the parts together but if you remove the nozzles & jets from the tubes it certainly gets complicated if they're not all the same size

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