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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since it has come to my attention that i never bothered to post my article...i'm not gonna go out of my way to try it again...so here it is..
post it if you want.


Ok, first things first, this isn’t exactly an easy job so get prepared first. The tools you will need are: Vice grips, various metric sockets starting from 9mm all the way up to 17mm and the corresponding socket wrenches to go with it. Wheel jacks, Phillips head screw driver, needle nose pliers, and a second person to help you.
The parts you will need are: obviously a transmission, the axle seals that go into the transmission, 3.6 quarts of transmission fluid, new clutch kit.

Remove your battery. Then unplug your wire that runs from the distributor to the coil pack. It’s now safe to work on the car.

Jack the car up about 1.5 to 2 feet. This will give you plenty of room to work underneath and get the transmission to drop through the bottom.

During the course of this tutorial, you will be removing a lot of bolts. I recommend getting a big poster and drawing where you remove the bolts from and then placing those bolts in that location on the poster. This will save you a lot of time and prevent from putting the wrong bolts in the wrong places.

DRAIN the transmission first before working on it. There is a plug that looks similar to the oil drain plug. The plug u want is on the bottom of the transmission. I didn’t really have to because I didn’t have any transmission fluid left thanks to a huge hole in my transmission case.

Ok, to start it off, start by removing the stock air box. This will allow you to unbolt the brackets and the sensors on the top of the transmission. The air box can be removed by 3 metric bolts sticking through the top. Once those bolts are removed, you can then unscrew the tensioner attached to the air box and the intake tube. Then, unscrew the tensioner that attaches the intake tube to the throttle body on the intake manifold. Then remove the intake tube from the valve cover, from underneath the manifold, and from the radiator. The part to remove from the radiator is a black U shaped tube. It is a simple pressure fit, so it’s easy to remove. Once the intake is out of the way, start by removing the little bracket that holds the slave cylinder wiring onto the transmission. It comes off with one bolt. Then, unbolt the bracket that holds the tubing that goes to the master cylinder. For those who don’t know what the master cylinder is, it’s the reservoir that holds fluid for both the brake system and our hydraulic clutch. This bracket comes off the top of the transmission in 2 bolts. Then, remove the 4 bolts from the top of the bell housing. The bell housing is where the transmission bolts to the engine. The point in this is to do all the work at the top first and then to remove what’s left from the bottom with out the transmission just falling out. You will notice 3 bolts that are partly covered by the battery. Leave those alone for now. The next step is to get underneath the car and remove the cross member bar. This not only holds the transmission, but also protects it. It looks like 2 bars joined together by a long metal plate. There are 4 bolts that attach it to the frame and 4 bolts that attach it to the transmission. Remove these and the plate will come off. Here is where I had some trouble. After 11 years or so, the bolts were seized. I broke one in the front and stripped another. I had to then remove the bumper and cut a hole in the frame and re weld on the lock bolts to the frame so that way the bolts wouldn’t just spin. After getting a new bolt and re-welding on the lock bolts, I removed the cross member. Next, Ya gotta unbolt the slave cylinder and the mount that goes with it. This is on the side of the transmission toward the radiator. The slave cylinder is part of the clutch. If you don’t know what it is, it’s not hard to miss; it’s the only things going into the transmission from the front. And the mount is just the transmission mount that attaches to the cross member when it’s in place. I recommend just taking a bungee cord and bungeeing the mount and the slave cylinder out of the way of your work area. You don’t want to completely remove it, just unbolt it from the transmission. Also, there is a sensor that goes into the transmission on the same side as the slave cylinder. Follow this sensor and unclip the wire harness and then unscrew it from the tranny. This is the reverse sensor. When the car is put into reverse, it tells the reverse lights to come on. Once all that has been unbolted, work toward the back. There is a black sensor that comes from the top of the transmission on the rear. This is the speedometer sensor. It serves 2 purposes, one, to report speed and 2, to act as the transmission fluid dipstick. It is kinda tricky to remove, so follow carefully. First, remove a bolt that attaches to a little Y shaped brace. This brace keeps the sensor from just popping out. Then lift up on the brace as you pull it away. It will come off. Then, working from the top of the car, reach down and pop it out. un attach all wiring from it and set it aside. Then remove the shift linkage. Be careful not to damage that rubber boot because you might need it.

Now that you’ve unbolted just about everything, its time to do the hard stuff. Remember, we still have those 3 bolts on a bracket on top of the transmission and we still have the bolts on the bottom of the bell housing to do. Don’t worry; we will get to that in a minute.

Remove both front tires because we will need to get to the rotors and axles.

Ok, you are gonna be wondering why, but we have to unbolt the rotors (round disc's that attach to the rims). Unbolt these with 2 bolts from the bottom. They are attached to what’s called a control arm. So, starting from the driver's side, un bolt the two bolts. Then have someone lift up on the rotor while u pushes down on the control arm. This separates the rotor from the control arm. Once this is done, you need to have someone pull back on the rotor(BE CAREFUL NOT TO PULL TOO HARD, pull back far, just do it gradually) while you pull on the axle. It might take a little elbow grease from both of you, but the axle will come out. If you didn’t drain the transmission, right now your face or clothes will be gettin drenched. Next, you need to get the other axle out. This is kinda tricky. Follow the same procedure to get the rotor off with one exception. You will actually have to remove a bolt that attaches the axle to the rotor. It’s found on the front of the rotor. This side is a little different. The axle is in 2 pieces on this side. Remove the axle from the rotor by pulling back once again on this side. Then pull the axle off from the other side. Then, pull that part out of the transmission. Like on the other side, its gonna take 2 ppl and a little elbow grease.

Ok, with luck, you've gotten the axles out. If they came out fairly easy, consider yourself lucky.

Next, using a jack, jack the jack up underneath the oil pan till it touches it. Then place something that is sturdy, like a stack of 2 by 4's underneath the oil pan. The purpose of this is to hold the engine up when we remove the transmission so use something sturdy. Next, jack the jack up underneath the transmission to hold it up. From the bottom, unbolt the remaining bolts to the bell housing. Don’t worry, if you did everything like I said, nothing will fall yet. NOW, from the top, start to remove those 3 bolts I said to disregard earlier. These are the last 3 bolts that hold up the transmission, so do it with care. Once they are out, that tranny is no longer attached and could fall. Carefully lower the jack. And there you have it! That transmission is outta there.

Okay, now some little work before putting the new one in. Its time to go parts scouting. You will need axle seals. Most parts shops say there are a couple matches, however, its a lot safer and easier to just pop the old seals out and take them to the store and just have them match them up. There are a left and right seal, so don’t mix them up and remember what side u pulled each one out of. Next, you will want to get a clutch kit. Chances are, if you've blown your transmission, then u've fried your clutch. Heck, even if u haven’t, do you really wanna un bolt it all again sometime down the road to put a new clutch in? I didn’t think so...

Now in my situation, not only did I bust a hole on the outside of the case, there was also one on the inside of the case. So when my tranny came out, a whole bunch of tranny fluid came into my face because it was sitting in the bell housing. My clutch was ruined because that oil soaked into the clutch disc. This is the plate that causes friction for the car to move. If you got fluid on that, your clutch is screwed...go get a new one. While you are at the store, get your tranny fluid.
**DISCLAIMER**
I will not be responsible for the choice of tranny fluid. I had a lot of hard time trying to find the right stuff because I didn’t have my ford book. Ford told me it should be mercon dextron III. They didn’t say it was it for sure, but they said that should be what I need to use. I was confused because mercon dextron III is automatic transmission fluid...I had a manual. I went to a few parts stores; they all said the same thing. So, I crossed my fingers and bought 4 quarts of it.

Now, getting the clutch off is easy, there are a few bolts around the outer edge that unbolt the clutch plate. Remove those and the plate along with the disc is off. You are now looking at your flywheel. Alright, this is where expertise comes in. I don’t know what the trouble signs of a flywheel are, so I just went ahead and took it off to get it resurfaced. Resurfacing is a must; just I’m not sure what the signs are that it needs it. So to be safe, get it done neway. You've already spent a lot of money buyin parts, so u might as well keep goin. Now for the clutch, I went ahead and treated myself to a stage 2. hehe. 2800 pounds of force, that lil bugger better grab every time.

Before you leave the parts store, I recommend asking if the clutch kit comes with an alignment tool. Follow the instructions on the clutch kit and align it as you bolt it on. Aligning it ensures that when you put the new transmission on, that the tranny will go into the clutch perfectly. Also in the clutch kit comes a round thingy. This is the clutch bearing. You will see the exact same thing inside the transmission. Pull the old one off and put on the new on your new transmission.

Time to work on the new tranny. Remove all the brackets off the transmission. You want to reuse all your old because u know that everything in your old one works, but you know nothing about the new transmission. Inspect the rubber mount on the new transmission. Then inspect the old mounts in your car. Whichever one is more stiff, that’s the one you want to use. Those help cushion your car from engine torque. (When u rev the car, the engine moves, this is called torquing. If it does it hard enough without cushioning, something can break....that’s bad). Put in the new seals you just bought for the tranny. There u go, new tranny is prepped.

Side quest time. With the new tranny prepped, the new clutch put on, and the old tranny out of the way...there is nothing stopping you from puttin the new tranny in.....well, here's where I recommend some other maintenance checks. While the axles are out and the rotors are freely moving, you might want to check your CV joints. These are seen by the black rubber boots located directly behind the rotor. There are also inner CV boots as well on both sides. Inspect them and check for torn boots. If you find a torn one, I recommend going yet again to the parts stores and buying new. If you don’t, you will have serious trouble. Those boots protect the CV joint from water and it keeps the grease in as well. if they are torn, sometime down the road, whether it be 2 days or months, imagine going down the road at about 70mph and then all the sudden, your rusting, un-greased CV joint seizes up. Balm, one side of your car stops moving, the axle breaks, the transmission goes out, something torques, your engine gets screwed, and on top of that, you've got to get control of your car before u wreck. Want that to happen? Didn’t think so, just spend the extra 10 bucks per boot and follow the instructions to replace them.

Ok, so you are now ready to put the new tranny in. This is where you really need to have 2 ppl. With the engine still propped up, you both need to get underneath the car and twist it round and push it up till you get it to go into the clutch. Hope you aligned it right. After about 10 mins of strenuous lifting, get it on, and quickly have someone put a bolt in the bell housing. If you just thread one in, it’s safe to let go of the tranny and it will hold. Rest for a little while, u deserve it. Ok, bolt all your bell housing bolts back on, put in the slave cylinder and bolt back on the mount. Put your reverse sensor back in. Bolt on your linkage again. Then bolt on the other side's mount. From the top, bolt on the 3 old brackets again. One holds wiring and is located toward the front of the tranny, one holds the tranny to the frame, this one is in the middle, just recycle the old bracket from your old tranny, and finally, the other bracket holds the lines for the hydraulic clutch and bolts on with 2 bolts. Ok, brackets are on, and bell housing is done. Next, you want to put the jack underneath the tranny. While one person jacks up slowly, the other person has to make sure the 3 bolts from the tranny bracket slide into the holes to the tranny mount. Once these are in the holes, bolt it back on. There you go!!, your tranny is now almost installed.

Time to re fit those axles. This requires a little bit of work. In fact, be patient with this whole section of work. If you get frustrated, go vent urself before returning back to it. Ok, working from the drivers side, refit your axle. While one person pushes it in back and forth, have the other slowly rotate the rotor. When it locks in, you will feel it go all the way in and it will clank. Then, re-bolt the control arm to the rotor. THIS is a huge pain. That control arm has a lot of force so its gonna take some elbow grease to line it up to the rotor. Get it up there and get it bolted in. Then, do the same thing from the other side with one exception. Like how you pulled it out, put the axle in the same way. The one piece goes in first, then put ur axle end on that piece, then have someone pull back on the rotor to put the axle back into it. Then struggle with the rotor and the control arm till its bolted back.

So, what’s left to do? The speed sensor and the cross member. So, go ahead and re-bolt your cross member. This might take a little bit of work to get to line back up too. Get it on and now your tranny is installed....PAT YOURSELF ON THE BACK.

Once that’s done Put your rims back on and check the lugs. Remove your engine props and lower that beast.

Last step. Fill the tranny with the fluid following the diagram on the transmission. If you can’t figure it out like I couldn’t, just make sure you put in 3.55 liters. The stuff I used had .946 liters per container so 3 and 3/4's of them will fill it. Just try not to over fill it because the tranny won’t lubricate right if it’s over filled and it will weep out the seals which could weaken them. Ok, so now replace the speedo sensor and replace that air box.

Reconnect the battery and the distributor wire. Now, try crankin her over. It should start because we didn’t mess with the engine, but here’s the tricky part. Try moving the car. Any noises? Ok, good. Try driving it around. Don’t use heat, don’t use A/c and don’t listen to the radio. Listen for noises that might scare you. If it feels stiff to shift into gear and stiff on clutch, that’s normal cuz u replaced the clutch (and if you have a stage 2, you will really feel weird pushing into the clutch) and u replaced the tranny..... Don’t drive too far and don’t start ripping them tires up. Give the tranny time to get worked into the car.

**Notice**

Let’s discuss why you might have possibly had to replace that tranny. How many of you out there are speed shifters? Do you feel you are an expert at it? cuz chances are, you aren’t. Speed shifting causes all of your gears to start to strip, when they do that, they wear down and u might lose one or two.
How many of you like to burn that rubber right of those tires. Ok, well u should consider stopping. Because your tires move at different times, you are putting not only force on the tranny, but also you are causing the planar/spider gears to spin at over 90,000 revolutions. This is what caused my tranny to go out. The planar gears transfer power from the tranny to the axles. Spinning the tires causes those gears to grind each other down. There is a metal shaft in charge of that transfer. My gears broke and just grinded into that shaft. It broke in two places and shot out the side of the tranny and into the bell housing. Not fun stuff. Stop speed shifting so much and stop spinning those tires. I know its retarded to say it and it might not be fun, but unless u want to spend the money again and the work again, maybe u should think about how u drive your car. Not to mention, burning rubber can spike your oil pressure and cause stress on that ole head and head gasket. Blow one of those and u might as well get a new car.
We can race, just race with care of your engine.

Hope this helps someone out as I did learn a lot in doing this. Give credit where credit is due and u guys can distribute where u want.
 

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While the tranny is out, this would be a good time to replace the crankshaft oil seal (it's underneath the flywheel). You don't have to do it but if your engine is leaking oil, chances are much of it is coming from the two crankshaft seals (one on the tranny end, the other on the timing belt end) and the oilpan gasket. The ONLY way to replace the one behind the tranny is to take it out. They're pretty cheap to replace. It would be a good idea to get some help from someone who has taken one out if you never have. Make sure you don't gouge the inside surface where the seal gets pushed into- mess that up badly enough and the only way to fix it will be to pull the engine and take it to a machine shop.

There should be decent instructions in your shop manual (Ford or Haynes).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
eh, i thought about that....but chances are if ur leakin oil from there u'd be burnin clutches pretty easy...

when any kind of liquid gets on a clutch disk it just absorbs it and keeps it there... it takes atleast a week if u cover the plate in kitty litter to get the oils and stuff out...

so if ur clutch isnt slipping often then i dont think thats a problem...

now on the timing end, i fear i might need that...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well i wrote another for replacing calipers, i've also got one for putting power windows in a 2 door escort....(thanks to degree_of_mentality) for showing me it was possible.... so who wants em
 

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