Tightening the cam sprocket on 2.0 SPI (SOHC) | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Tightening the cam sprocket on 2.0 SPI (SOHC)

Discussion in '3rd Gen 1997-2002 2.0L SOHC' started by cyclonez, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. cyclonez

    cyclonez FEOA Donator

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    I am just putting a 1999 2.0 SPI back together after some thorough overhaul work (see my other thread). The overhaul involved a rebuilt cylinder head. We needed to swap the cam sprocket between the old and new head for that.

    At one point, I had to stop working on the car for about a month. We continued putting it back together; we are now about finished and then I thought about the cam sprocket and wasn't sure if we had torqued it a month before. I checked and it appears that we did NOT torque it. It's now on the car and I'm wondering how we're going to hold the sprocket in order to get the bolt to the appropriate torque. The A/C line is in the way so that we cannot get an impact/air wrench in there. It appears the A/C line is the only thing keeping us from getting an air wrench in there to do it.

    Does anyone have any ideas on how we might get this torqued?

    Thanks!
  2. white-lightning

    white-lightning FEOA Member

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    I used a impact grade universal joint w/ my impact when I re-installed mine.
  3. millball

    millball FEOA Donator

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    There is a large hex on the sprocket hub.
    I held the sprocket with a large boxend wrench and torqued with a regular socket and torque wrench.
  4. TripleLude

    TripleLude FEOA Member

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    I wouldn't use an impact on it unless it was off the car, even if there was clearance.

    Just get a torque wrench and I think it is like 80-90 ft/lbs (please check first). Like stated above, use the large hex on the sprocket to hold it steady. You might need a very large, quality adjustable wrench. Don't sweat it, as a good torque wrench is precise and usually has plenty of leverage.

    Oh, and I want to suggest you should remove the timing belt, especially if you want to try an impact.
  5. cyclonez

    cyclonez FEOA Donator

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    I'm not sure we can get a boxend on it because there's a washer that goes behind the nut. That washer appears larger than the part behind it. I think the only option would be an open end wrench and we don't have one big enough.
  6. millball

    millball FEOA Donator

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    Grind the washer a little smaller. Any part of the washer that is larger than the sprocket boss isn't doing anything useful in any case.
  7. cyclonez

    cyclonez FEOA Donator

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    It's up to 60 lb/ft. Is that going to be enough? Ford manual says 70-85 so I'm concerned about going with 60.
  8. TripleLude

    TripleLude FEOA Member

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    Only if you want to replace the cylinder head in the near future.

    If you don't have an open wrench that is big enough, go and get one. Better to spend a little now rather than a whole lot later. You'll find many uses for that wrench too.
  9. cyclonez

    cyclonez FEOA Donator

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    Yeah I agree. I'm arguing this with my father who says 60 is good enough (he wants it done). But I'm not one for cutting corners. Thanks.

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