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Discussion Starter #1
A couple of weeks ago I noticed it took a little longer for the wagon to fire up but I didn't really think there was anything to it but it has gotten progressively worse. I checked the fuel rail pressure gauge and, sure enough, the fuel system is not holding pressure. The car starts after some cranking and runs perfectly after that so I don't think it's the actual pump itself that is the issue.

I realize that after a while the pressure will dissipate but the pressure almost immediately dissipates after I shut the car off which it shouldn't do.

My guess is that the fuel cap has a leak and isn't holding pressure but I've been told by a very reliable source that the problem is probably in the fuel line that goes to the fuel pump.

Does anyone have experience with this type of issue and how did you resolve it?

John
 

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I would check the fuel filler hose. I had to replace them on two different wagons now, the rubber gets old and brittle and cracks causing a leak.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I would check the fuel filler hose. I had to replace them on two different wagons now, the rubber gets old and brittle and cracks causing a leak.
I thought 3rd gens had solid metal filler tubes as opposed to 2nd gens that used a rubber hose?

John
 

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Your fuel cap has absolutely nothing to do with line pressure. There is a check valve in either the pump or the fuel pressure regulator that is meant to hold pressure on the rail when the engine is off. The tank is not pressurized.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
T
Your fuel cap has absolutely nothing to do with line pressure. There is a check valve in either the pump or the fuel pressure regulator that is meant to hold pressure on the rail when the engine is off. The tank is not pressurized.
Thank You for that info. Your post has helped me narrow down the issue.

If the issue is at the FPR do I need to replace it or can I just replace the check valve? I'll look for the check valve on the fuel pump.

John
 

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The fuel pump should have some kind of a one-way valve on its outlet, since its the entire fuel delivery line that has some residual pressure in it I believe. Note that losing the function of the one-way valve is probably fairly common; it just means taking slightly longer before the engine will be firing. (Maybe one second longer) I have several Escorts, and to the extent I have checked the residual pressures, some of them lose the pressure in a few hours, some hold it for days.

I thought all of the 2nd gen and 3rd gen LX escorts had the same metal fuel filler tubing and the same rubber hose (with slightly angled end). One one of my semi-rusty Escorts, the metal filler pipe was rusted enough on top that it had begun to leak. I brazed a thin metal plate over the spot, and painted the fuel filler hose assembly. At the time I didnt know the replacement fuel filler tubing was available from rockauto. I also had to replace the KFL-22 larger hose, which had cracks at the place where it is stretched over the inlet to the tank.

P.S. I just finished replacing both the large and small rubber hoses between the tank and the fuel filler assembly on our 91 hatchback. . It was the #16 in the diagram. I had to unbolt the tank support straps and let the back end of the tank sag down a couple of inches; in order to be able to reach the spring clamp that was on top of the tank for the smaller hose. I didnt remove the heat shields or exhaust pipe - so the tank didnt want to lower any further.
 

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T

Thank You for that info. Your post has helped me narrow down the issue.

If the issue is at the FPR do I need to replace it or can I just replace the check valve? I'll look for the check valve on the fuel pump.

John
It's almost certainly a part of the fuel pump module, and the entire in-tank unit should be replaced. Due to its age, the plastic parts are probably breaking down anyway. The check valve will not be a part that can be replaced on its own. If you're in a rust prone area, get a new lock ring also because they tend to rust up so bad you cannot reuse it.
 

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I fully agree with not waiting until the old fuel pump, and its plastic parts, stop working in the usual inconvenient location. (Too many highways in the LA area dont even have shoulders anymore!) I bought a new fuel tank last year, just to have it against the day that one of my escorts has the lock-ring 'ears' so badly corroded that they wont hold the lock ring down any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's almost certainly a part of the fuel pump module, and the entire in-tank unit should be replaced. Due to its age, the plastic parts are probably breaking down anyway. The check valve will not be a part that can be replaced on its own. If you're in a rust prone area, get a new lock ring also because they tend to rust up so bad you cannot reuse it.
So you feel the pump unit should be replaced? I replaced this pump a couple of years ago but I guess I shouldn't be surprised since it's an aftermarket unit. I'm going to start searching for the best price on an OEM Motorcraft unit. As an alternative are there any aftermarket brands that you would recommend?

I fully agree with not waiting until the old fuel pump, and its plastic parts, stop working in the usual inconvenient location. (Too many highways in the LA area dont even have shoulders anymore!) I bought a new fuel tank last year, just to have it against the day that one of my escorts has the lock-ring 'ears' so badly corroded that they wont hold the lock ring down any more.
As mentioned the pump is fairly new but an aftermarket brand, Carter I believe.

I hear you about the whole shoulder thing. Out here the traffic is so bad they've been trying to keep up with the sprawl by expanding the highways through shoulder elimination.

John
 

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RockAuto offers both a Spectra Premium and a Delphi branded unit for around $100. I would use either one myself. Delphi is OE for GM vehicles, so you can expect reasonable quality even though it is aftermarket. I don't blame you for avoiding a $300+ Motorcraft unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RockAuto offers both a Spectra Premium and a Delphi branded unit for around $100. I would use either one myself. Delphi is OE for GM vehicles, so you can expect reasonable quality even though it is aftermarket. I don't blame you for avoiding a $300+ Motorcraft unit.
I saw that but decided to hold off and see if the cheap ebay one worked.

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I saw that but decided to hold off and see if the cheap ebay one worked.

John
Do as you wish. I prefer not to have to do the job twice when the junk parts fail early. But I guess that's just me. I see a lot of people on here fooling around with junky parts just to save a few bucks. From my experience with cheapo parts... it's just not worth the hassle. I have enough issues with my 31 year old car without repeating the repairs I've already done!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Do as you wish. I prefer not to have to do the job twice when the junk parts fail early. But I guess that's just me. I see a lot of people on here fooling around with junky parts just to save a few bucks. From my experience with cheapo parts... it's just not worth the hassle. I have enough issues with my 31 year old car without repeating the repairs I've already done!
Replacing the fuel pump is a fairly quick R & R so I figured I'd take a chance and see how long this one lasts. Probably a couple years like the one that is failing now.

thanks for sharing this link. I bought 2 of these just now. much appreciated
Right? I mean for $27......

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Replacing the fuel pump is a fairly quick R & R so I figured I'd take a chance and see how long this one lasts.
Is there an access door on those? I only really know my way around first gen cars. Pulling the tank isn't a big deal on a car which isn't rusty... but I still would avoid doing so haha... I don't care for R&Ring gas tanks. I've had mine out once and that is enough for me. It won't be coming out again unless the pump or sender fails or the tank leaks. Fortunately I've found a handful of NOS genuine Ford tank units for my car on Ebay for under $60 each.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Is there an access door on those? I only really know my way around first gen cars. Pulling the tank isn't a big deal on a car which isn't rusty... but I still would avoid doing so haha... I don't care for R&Ring gas tanks. I've had mine out once and that is enough for me. It won't be coming out again unless the pump or sender fails or the tank leaks. Fortunately I've found a handful of NOS genuine Ford tank units for my car on Ebay for under $60 each.
The fuel pump and gas tank in 3rd gens is under the rear seat. Rear seat bottom pulls away revealing a cover plate where the connections to the fuel system electricals are. Disconnect them, remove the plate, twist off the lock ring and expose the fuel pump. Remove the old pump and pour the remaining gas from the old pump into the tank opening. Install the new pump. Now do it in reverse.....

John
 

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The fuel pump and gas tank in 3rd gens is under the rear seat. Rear seat bottom pulls away revealing a cover plate where the connections to the fuel system electricals are. Disconnect them, remove the plate, twist off the lock ring and expose the fuel pump. Remove the old pump and pour the remaining gas from the old pump into the tank opening. Install the new pump. Now do it in reverse.....

John
Well not all of us can be that lucky haha I have never owned a vehicle with an access door to get at the pump without removing the tank. That changes things a little bit.

I once had to remove the fuel tank from a Chevy van twice in the same day because I foolishly forgot to install the float onto the new sending unit, causing the fuel gauge to always read empty. OOPS! Won't make that mistake again!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well not all of us can be that lucky haha I have never owned a vehicle with an access door to get at the pump without removing the tank. That changes things a little bit.

I once had to remove the fuel tank from a Chevy van twice in the same day because I foolishly forgot to install the float onto the new sending unit, causing the fuel gauge to always read empty. OOPS! Won't make that mistake again!
I hear ya. Having to replace the filler hose on my '61 T-Bird was a pain in the ass. I had to drain and drop the tank to get access. The crappy part was having to line up the hose with the tank and still leave enough room to get a hand in there to tighten the worm clamp.

John
 
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