Sencond Gen Rear Drum Brakes | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Sencond Gen Rear Drum Brakes

Discussion in 'How-To's' started by Trencher, Jan 29, 2006.

  1. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    Escort Rear Drum Brake How-to

    I never saw a disclaimer on the website so I'll put this one in my post.

    Trencher (Brian Collins), does not now, nor will in the future, be held liable or responsible for the information contained within any or all of his Technical Advice. Nor the use or misuse to which individuals intend to apply said information. Any and all individuals that undertake the projects, plans or ideas that are offered, do so of their own free will and accept responsibility for their own actions, abilities and inability's.

    It should be stressed that any and all of FEOA.net and or individuals that are listed or implied within Trencher's (Brian Collins) Technical Advice are held blameless and assume no liabilities for the understanding or misunderstanding of information relating to themselves or any third parties associated with them. In laymen's terms; this is free advice, that you can either view or disregard. A reasonable effort has been, and will be, put forth to offer information in a clear manner.


    I will try to explain how to replace the brakes on a second Gen Escort. I have never posted a howto before so this is my first. Also keep in mind that I'm a redneck, and if I can't spell a word I will spell it phonetically. I don't want to get attacked by the spelling nazi's (high).

    [​IMG]

    Here's the basic tools you will need. Vise style needle nose pliers, Dead blow hammer, #3 Philips screwdriver, #2 regular screwdriver, wrench for the #3, and I believe it's a 8mm bolt (2 if you have them handy).

    [​IMG]

    You will probably need a can of penetrating oil.

    [​IMG]

    A little anti-seize is also helpful for brake work later on down the road. (as per high's idea)

    [​IMG]

    Note: I won't go into the intricacies of how to remove the wheels. If you can't do that, then don't jack with the brakes. Having some mechanical ability is a must to do this job. Imagine what it would be like to get crushed inside a beer can.

    I highly recommend using jack stands. Although you'll never be under the car it would suck to have to replace the backing plates.

    [​IMG]

    Shoot some penetrating oil in the threaded holes for later. Next your going to want to set the ebrake and grab that #3 Phillips screwdriver and wrench. It shouldn't take much to get these screws loose. If you do run into problems purchase a impact driver. This will save you allot of problems rather than stripping the head of the screw.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Removing the drum. You can do this one of 2 ways. Remember to release the ebrake. You can use the bolt in the threaded holes and press it off side to side. Meaning couple of turns on one side then move to other side. Or you can take the dead blow hammer and strike it twice real hard and take it off by hand (My personal favorite).

    [​IMG]

    If you have a poor memory then this is where a Polaroid will come in handy or a digital camera. Undoubtedly you will be doing both side so only do one at a time and you'll have a reverse reference.

    Note: This is where I got real uncomfortable. This is the same brake setup that is on the Kawasaki Mule 2500/3000. This does not inspire much confidence in the brake system of the car.

    [​IMG]

    Start removing springs and laying them out in the same orientation that you are removing them. Use the needle nose from the tool list.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next remove the retainer pins. This is where the flat screwdriver comes in.

    [​IMG]

    Remove the brake shoes, laying them out in the same way you laid out the springs.

    [​IMG]

    Now that you have everything removed you can start going backwards.

    Note: The reason you don't see any brake dust, and puddles of $#!+ on the ground is because I used compressed air to blow the dust out. Now it's all over my wife's truck.

    [​IMG]

    Put all the springs back on. Pretty easy just use the pliers. You see this little cam mechanism. You need to adjust this.

    [​IMG]

    It needs to look like this. You'll need that flat screwdriver again for this. You also may want to release the bleeder valve so the shoes suck back in.

    [​IMG]

    Take the anti-seize and put a thin coat around the center of the hub.

    [​IMG]

    Do the same thing on the center of the drum. You can also put it in the threaded holes to protect the threads. In this case my wheels don't cover the holes so it will be gone in a couple of days.

    [​IMG]

    You can also put a dab on the screws to make the job easier later on down the road.

    [​IMG]

    Set the ebrake again and tighten the screws. You'll need to bleed the brakes. Then put your wheels back on and that's it your done. You might want to rachet the ebrake a couple of times to get the brake cams to adjust up before you bleed the brakes.

    [​IMG]

    I hope this how-to is helpfull to you, and goodluck.
  2. highanddry

    highanddry Guest

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    Nice write-up.

    The only thing I'll add is to apply some white lithium grease to both ends of each shoe, so the shoes can pivot around freely.

    Also, there are several (6) little flat spots on the brake backing where you should also apply a dab of lith grease to allow the metal edge of the shoe to move freely within its range of movement.

    You get an 8/10 on spelling. I won't point out the mistakes. :D
  3. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    Your right, I didn't mention that. I used dry moly lube.

    The credit needs to go to FrontPage. I stripped it from my own website, and pasted in FrontPage to use the spell checker. I did a little touchup and ported to Pawsoft Fass and made the bbCode corrections. Then I posted it here. :D
  4. Josh_LX

    Josh_LX FEOA Member

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    I think its a great right up, spelling Nazis be dammed.
  5. Josh_LX

    Josh_LX FEOA Member

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    I know I spelled "right" wrong High, I did it just to piss you off. :p

    Now, back on topic.
  6. highanddry

    highanddry Guest

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    Also "its" should be "it's" and "dammed" should be "damned".

    3 errors in 11 words and only one was intentional. BUUUUUUUUUUUUURN. :lol:

    Sorry Trencher, but you can always count on a hijack. Some mods (well, at least one, anyway) don't like it, but it's great to have technical stuff AND a light hearted atmosphere. Better for the site, better for everyone.
  7. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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  8. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    No actually the anti-seize is to keep the drum from getting suck on. That way the next time around you can just remove the screws and then pull it off by hand (in theory anyway). I used a stuff called dry moly lube for what high was referring too. It's made by a company called Spray-on. I get it from Club Car, but I'm sure it could be had anywhere. You can't really see it in the pictures, but you spray it like paint and then it drys like paint. It's kind of like having a permanent film of graphite. Neato stuff. I use it on all kinds of stuff. The only place it didn't work was my ole busted Dodge van's door hinges. No matter what I put on them a few days later they squeak. :(
  9. CaptainRazor

    CaptainRazor Guest

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    While we're on the subject, and high is playing the spelling nazi part :) I'll chime in for future reference.

    People listen closely- your is NOT a contraction for you are

    However - you're IS a contraction for you are.

    This concludes this grammer lesson, we now return you to * your regularly scheduled programming.



    (*note NOT a contraction in this sentence)

    P.S. Nice how-to, good pics and everything.
  10. me19875

    me19875 New Member

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    darn, if only this was about the front brakes. good write up though, it looks idiot proof.
  11. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    I could do one on the front brakes, but why? 2 bolts, 2 cotter pins. Not much to explain. Is it really nessisary(I know it's spelled wrong). I could take them apart again and document.
  12. dcorwin822

    dcorwin822 New Member

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    i'd like to make a note about the self adjuster for the parking break... sometimes that likes to seize and when it does it creates one hell of a problem. the sucker likes to seize in the outward position makeing the shoes rub on the drum. it also makes the pedal feel real soft and alows you to wear though the shoes real fast. sence it's winter here in NY i can't really get any pics of what i mean but this coming summer when i do my yearly break job i'll show you guys what i mean.
  13. ktmac0122

    ktmac0122 Guest

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    Just to add a few comments to the How-To, which was very informative.

    1) For the few extra dollars it costs, around $13 to $15, buy yourself a new hardware kit with springs, pins and clips. Well worth the money since those springs looked to have a little corrosion on them.

    2) When using compressed air to "blow" off the back plate, use a mask or something. Hate to see anyone start coughing up the "black" stuff.

    Other then that, nice article.
  14. LariRudi

    LariRudi FEOA Donator

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    Revive Rear Brake Photos?

    I know that everybody on here now is an expert on doing their rear brakes with drums.

    For ME, last time was on a 1969 Ford Country Squire back in prob 1973?

    So in the original post, this thread has been around so long that the photos have disappeared. Anybody wanna revive the photos in a current post? If NOT, is it going to have to be ME? [grin]? My time is coming SOOON on the rear brakes of my 1994 Escort 1.9LX 5spd SW.

    thx,

    LarryR
  15. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    Re: Revive Rear Brake Photos?

    Ill see if I have them backed up at work. 2006 Wow. Thats a ways to dig back.


    UPDATE: Fixed
  16. EscorGo

    EscorGo FEOA Donator

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  17. LariRudi

    LariRudi FEOA Donator

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    Re: Revive Rear Brake Photos?

    Thanks a jillion for your historical efforts; glad you still had them. I'll also check out the video mentioned above.

    All photos are back now. Oh, EXCEPT the one by the "UPDATE" sentence, which is prob part of your signature?

    LarryR
  18. Trencher

    Trencher FEOA Member

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    Re: Revive Rear Brake Photos?

    Fixed that too. Not as good as my old animated one of High's car turning to rust dust as I blow past him.

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