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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired a 1995 19l ford escort wagon. It has milkshake for the oil and runs like crap as well as burning coolant.

Anyways, I am trying to replace the head gasket but I am confused as to what I actually have to remove to get the head off. The bracket that holds the Alt/ps/A/C is proving to be a pain in the ass to deal with. I dont even know how many bolts it has holding it on.

Does anyone have any input? I searched but didnt find much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a timing belt and water pump already waiting.

For future searches:

You only have to remove one bolt from the aluminum bracket on the front to remove the head. Its the bolt behind the alternator. Removal of the alternator is necessary as well as the power steering resovoir to get to that bolt. Removing the bracket is not necessary.

Also, when removing the timing belt cover, you will have to remove the motor mount next to it and raise that side of the motor with a jack underneath. The accessory belt tensioner will have to be removed as well. The cover will take some encouragement to get off after removing the only two bolts that hold it on.
 

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Haynes was VERY well done on the 'scorts. (not so well on Park Avenues I found out)

Personally didn't find it necessary to wholly remove the alternator or power steering reservoir. Just pivot the alternator out of the way. It is also possible to remove the alternator, without removing the reservoir. (tight fit, but doable when positioned right to squeeze it past the reservoir)
 

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The accessory bracket has 7 bolts (one or two of them may be studs). One of the bolts goes into the head. That one you dont re-install and torque until the head bolts have been torqued.
I found I had to unbolt the accessory bracket in order to slide the exhaust manifold out far enough to remove it. Wouldnt be a problem if you pull the head with the exh. manifold still attached; but I like to have both manifolds off the head before I remove it. That way its a one man lift, no hoist or helper needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Holy cow I got everything together just fine and was going to change the oil. Today, when I went to unscrew the oil drain bolt, my 16 mm socket rounded it off. Its that tight. I have tried everything. Nothing will break it loose.

I heated it up with a torch while banging the vice grips that are latched onto the bolt with a 5 lb sledge. Doesnt even budge.

Is this bolt reverse threaded?
 

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Counter-clockwise loosens... no; shouldn't be reverse threaded. I've always used 5/8 box wrench to take mine off. As far as I know it's the only standard head on the vehicle. Everything else I've encountered is metric. Came with a plastic washer; though folks unnecessarily replace those somehow thinking that the old metal ones are better. (if they're breaking the plastic ones then they're putting the bolt on too tight)

There's a special tool that's made to grip rounded-off bolts but I can't think of the name. Will ask my Brother later...

'94 LX Sedan
 

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zzyzzx said:
I also hate 12 point sockets.

Anyway, the oil pan drain bolt is either a 13mm or 14mm. I have never used a standard "English" socket on this car.
Good point. Pun intended :)

If it is rounded to the point (pun again) of no return, they make "wrenches" that just grab the head to turn. Hope it's not cross threaded.
 

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At this point, many drain pan bolts are probably no longer original equipment.

5/8 translates to 15.88mm. 4g64fiero stated that he was using a 16mm. That's likely why his was rounded off. I believe standard is/was the drain-bolt standard in the US with the idea of making things easier for oil change garages.

Try parrot-nosed pliars. Those grips are gold; molded by Mother Nature herself.
 

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Intuit said:
At this point, many drain pan bolts are probably no longer original equipment.

5/8 translates to 15.88mm. 4g64fiero stated that he was using a 16mm. That's likely why his was rounded off. I believe standard is/was the drain-bolt standard in the US with the idea of making things easier for oil change garages.
.
I don't see a metric threaded bolt being made with an English head.

I get my replacement oil pan bolts at the dealer.
 

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Standard heads are unusual on vehicles. As I've stated, it's the only standard head on the vehicle that I'm aware of. 15mm doesn't fit, 16mm would round it off. What else would it be other than standard. Drain pan bolt heads may have well been one of the last hold-outs on a long dead era. Frankly, can't say I miss those evil fractions. With exception to that 5/8 box wrench, all of my standard tools are shiny brand-new... looking.
 

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Intuit said:
Standard heads are unusual on vehicles. As I've stated, it's the only standard head on the vehicle that I'm aware of. 15mm doesn't fit, 16mm would round it off. What else would it be other than standard. Drain pan bolt heads may have well been one of the last hold-outs on a long dead era. Frankly, can't say I miss those evil fractions. With exception to that 5/8 box wrench, all of my standard tools are shiny brand-new... looking.
Just for the record, 5/8" and 16mm wrenches can be used interchangeably. I do it all the time.

I haven't done the math, but 15.88mm sounds about right for 5/8". That .12mm is not enough to cause a 'rounded off' head (assuming the wrench and bolt head were both in good condition) and is well within manufacturing tolerances.

You'll find that bolt-head sizes tend to be a tiny bit smaller than 'advertised' to make up for manufacturing tolerances for the wide variety of tools. There also has to be a bit of 'wiggle-room' so that these tools can easily be installed and removed. If the bolt head happened to be 16.01mm and the wrench happened to be 15.99mm, then it would be difficult to get the wrench in place, and also difficult to get it removed from the bolt due to the interference fit.

Likely, a combination of a worn (or cheap Chinese-made) wrench, worn bolt head, and/or possibly not having the wrench properly squared on the bolt head is what caused this to round off.

Technically, this *IS* a 16mm bolt head (even Autozone lists it as a 14mmX1.5mm thread and a 16mm head), but even so, they will NEVER put a standard sized head on a metric-threaded bolt.

Regardless of the debate, I do tend to prefer to use a 5/8" wrench on the 16mm drain plugs as they do fit a bit more snugly, and can compensate for a worn bolt-head.
 

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Good info. You're right it's only a ~1% difference. 15.88mm is precise however. Eons ago I tried using 16mm (because it's more convenient to use the tools you already out) and found it too loose for comfort. 5/8 gave me the tightest fit.

Tighter tolerances is one of the reasons why mechanics prefer Snap-On tools. (they're certainly not cheap!) I don't require that kind of durability and quality + like Craftsmen's replacement policy, so stick with them for the most part. (and they fit noticeably 'looser' than Snap-On)

Perhaps it was just the combination of being worn, overtightened and using a 12-point, that rounded his off...

Conversion chart...
http://www.precisionscrewandbolt.com/metric.htm
Fastener Conversion Chart
Inch Equivalent Metric Size-Pitch
ISO and IFI Rec.
UNC UNF
1 - 64 1 - 72 M2 x 0.4
3 - 48 3 - 56 M2.5 x 0.45
4 - 40 4 - 48 M3 x .05
6 - 32 6 - 40 M3.5 x .06
8 - 32 8 - 36 M4 x .07
10 - 24 10 - 32 M5 x .08
1/4 - 20 1/4 - 28 M6 x 1
5/16 -18 5/16 - 24 M8 x 1.25
3/8 -16 3/8 - 24 M10 x 1.5
7/16 -14 7/16 - 20 M12 x 1.75
1/2 - 13 1/2 - 20 M14 x 2
5/8 - 11 5/8 - 18 M18 x 2
3/4 - 10 3/4 - 16 M20 x 2.5
1 - 8 1-12 M24 x 3
1-1/4 - 7 1-1/8 - 12 M30 x 3.5
1-1/2 - 6 1-1/4 - 12 M36 x 4
 
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