FEOA Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would greatly appreciate any information on what the two screws are that hold the sensor in place. Are the special? Any information would be appreciated. I get a code of 214 when checking with a OBD1 scanner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
I would greatly appreciate any information on what the two screws are that hold the sensor in place. Are the special? Any information would be appreciated. I get a code of 214 when checking with a OBD1 scanner.
Although the machined boss that the camshaft position sensor sits against has two threaded holes, the sensor is held in place by one single machine screw ("bolt" to most folks).
The other threaded hole is obscured by the connection leg of the sensor.

If you have misplaced the bolt, it is an M8-1.0x20, with a captive washer.
The hex head of the bolt is typically 13mm, although I have seen 10mm heads.
The diameter and thread pitch of this bolt is identical to an intake manifold stud - the holes in the head were drilled and tapped identically.

To remove the sensor, one must first remove the intake manifold (clever design, huh?).
It behooves you to check and clean the harness connection, and do the other resistance/voltage tests before going to the effort of pulling the manifold.

There are a myriad of other threads that discuss this - do a search on "214".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,531 Posts
Are you sure that you are having a problem with the sensor itself, as opposed to it not being plugged in good after being bumped several times while attempting to change the fuel filter?

Obligatory: Ask me how I know this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Although the machined boss that the camshaft position sensor sits against has two threaded holes, the sensor is held in place by one single machine screw ("bolt" to most folks).
The other threaded hole is obscured by the connection leg of the sensor.

If you have misplaced the bolt, it is an M8-1.0x20, with a captive washer.
The hex head of the bolt is typically 13mm, although I have seen 10mm heads.
The diameter and thread pitch of this bolt is identical to an intake manifold stud - the holes in the head were drilled and tapped identically.

To remove the sensor, one must first remove the intake manifold (clever design, huh?).
It behooves you to check and clean the harness connection, and do the other resistance/voltage tests before going to the effort of pulling the manifold.

There are a myriad of other threads that discuss this - do a se
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you sure that you are having a problem with the sensor itself, as opposed to it not being plugged in good after being bumped several times while attempting to change the fuel filter?

Obligatory: Ask me how I know this!
On my sensor, there appears to be two. One maybe a fake. I am also replacing the time belt. Looks like I can get better access to the crank case sensor. I will do this when I replace the timing belt. I have been very fortunate to have had this belt get over 150,000 plus miles. Appears to still be in good shape. Thank you for responding. The bolt or screw looks like it is special. Wish it was a metric hex! If you hear strange moaning and groaning echoing from west Georgia area of Carrollton. It's just me! :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My camshaft senor difinitely appears to have two mounting screws. Wish the bolts were metic heads. Wife would be much better. Thank you for you infor and response!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
39,454 Posts
are you thinking about the crank sensor, down low on the front pulley? the cam sensor should be on the head, under the throttle body and held in by 1 single screw
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
My camshaft senor difinitely appears to have two mounting screws. Wish the bolts were metic heads. Wife would be much better. Thank you for you infor and response!
I'm not sure how your wife is involved here, but we can leave that for another day.

You originally started this thread with the words camshaft sensor and code 214.
Those two terms in fact go together, and refer to something bolted into the HEAD with ONE SINGLE fastener.

Then, you bring the timing belt into the discussion, which is nowhere near the camshaft sensor, but IS near the crankshaft sensor that
IS attached with two fasteners.

Here are my new recommendations, based on this additional information:

1. If the timing belt is anywhere near that old, you should contact the Guinness Book of World Records (and also replace the timing belt and water pump).
2. It is not necessary to remove the crankshaft sensor to accomplish these things.
3. Replacing the crankshaft sensor will ALSO have NO bearing on a code 214, since that code is related to the camshaft sensor, held in the head with one bolt.
4. Reread 2. and 3. above - there is NO REASON for you to remove the crankshaft sensor, and no need to worry about the two funky fasteners.
5. For help on code 214, read my original response, and perhaps do a site search of "214".
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top