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Discussion Starter #1
First off, my car's A/C does work, but I think it should blow colder, so I'm looking to buy a couple cans of R134A freon (with StopLeak) My dad has the recharge kit, so all I will need is a couple cans I figure. A couple questions:

1. Where is the best place to buy freon, or are they mostly all the same? I have seen them almost everywhere from Wal-Mart to AutoZone. I'm thinking one brand might be better quality than the others.

2. How much freon does my car take? (1995 Ford Escort LX sedan) I 'm not sure if my dad's recharge kit's dial is measured in PSI or LB's, so both answers would be appreciated, so I get the correct amount of freon in there.
Thanks!!
 

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Should be a sticker under your hook that tells you how much the system holds.

HOWEVER since your A/C is working, you already have some freon in it. Unless you dump what's already there, you can't put in the total amount the system will hold.

You dad's gauge should read in PSI......

Hook it up and start the engine. Turn on your A/C and see what gauge reading your getting now. IF your using a charge kit, it will hook in on the low side of the system. Ideally, you want to see approx 30 PSI.

You will want to have a fan blowing on your condensor ( or some cold water running over it ) to simulate air running through it. This will give you a much more accurate reading on your gauge.

Just add enough freon to bring the gauge reading to around 30 PSI.

Take care, because your reading will go up above 30 as you add freon and after you've shut the charge tap off and run the engine for a minute the gauge reading will drop back down to it's running pressure.

Add a little at a time until it settle in around the 30 PSI and that's all you need.

Any more than that will be counter productive.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the great reply!

One more question. Are the different brands of freon generally the same, or should I buy some at Autozone rather than Wal-Mart, etc?
 

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iamdrumming said:
Thanks for the great reply!

One more question. Are the different brands of freon generally the same, or should I buy some at Autozone rather than Wal-Mart, etc?
For the most part, Freon (R134) is Freon. Buy it where you can get the best price. One thing to note: Freon is sold by weight so make sure that even though the cans look to be the same size, there is the same amount in each can. It wouldn't surprise me if an off brand contained a few less ounces.
 

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You always put in freon using the low side port. On my 92 Escort it is located near the firewall, on the low pressure line (larger than the high pressure lines) that runs back over the top of the engine from the a.c. compressor. I think its in the same place on the later 2nd gen. Escorts that came with R134 in the system.
The high side port is on the driver's side front of the engine compartment. You never use that one for recharging/filling.
 

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Proud owner of 1991 Ford Escort LX 1.9 Girlie car
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I have a 91 escort lx 1.9...I bought one of those do it yourself recharge kit. The kit came with a quick connect fitting. How do i connect? The one son my car are threaded?? HELP...Thanks
 

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The threaded ports are the old standard ports for R12 refrigerant.
The recharge kits that are available to the public today are for the new R134A refrigerant that all cars use since the 1994 model year.
It may be that your 1991 car has not been retrofitted to use the new refrigerant. Ordinarily,after a changover/retrofit has been done, the correct fittings for the new type refrigerant are left permanantly in place and prominant labels are placed under the hood.
You will likely have to do a little more than simply add some gas to your AC to get it working.
 

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Thanks for the response....Is a change over pricey?
I had a 1992 wagon I converted. I am only a newbie but I've learned from mistakes. The biggest problem you are going to have is you really, really, need to get a vacuum drawn on the system first, otherwise refilling it with anything is throwing away money.

The conversion I used was this:

Interdynamics EZ Chill R-12 to R-134a Recharge and Retrofit Kit
http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/we...arge-and-retrofit-kit-interdynamics_9220004-p

Use coupon code TRT30 for 30 percent off at checkout

But again, you need to get the R12 out of the system first. What I did was go around to shops until I found one with a recovery machine that was willing to vacuum it out for free since they get R12 for free. But at first they won't be willing until you point that out.

If your system is already empty from leaking over the years you can buy a vacuum pump from Harbor Freight for $70-$80 or borrow one from Autozone for a $300 deposit (refunded).

I am a total newbie at this and the first time took a little while to figure out, but once you understand how the a/c works and the low vs high port, it's gets easier each time.

You also probably want a manifold gauge set from Harbor Freight which costs about $45 after coupons.

Do not just dump R134a into the R12 system, it won't work and you'll break something very quickly.
 

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All I can say about price is that you should shop around.
Some have just bought a cheapo Autozone type do it yourself kit and have gotten decent results, others, not so much:(.
Partly, the costs of a good conversion job will depend on what kind of shape that your AC system is in presently.
You might also consider an AC repair that keeps the old R12 refrigerant. Many shops will not do this type of repair, but some will.
I have a '93 wagon that still has an original R12 AC and I will never change it as long as it is possible to get the old refrigerant by hook or crook.
 
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