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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I replaced my radiator yesterday along with a 180 thermostat. (It has to be one of the easiast things to change on this car). Is that the temp everyone suggests? The car (91gt) is running alot cooler now. It just gets to the n in normal or a little past on the gauge now. with the 195 it was running on the r to m range. Just wish I would have had the header to put on while the radiator was out. It gives you quite a bit more room to work. but the money for the header replaced my radiator. Hopefully the exhaust system will be next.
 

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Cool beans. I wanna replace my radiator & t-stat as well. my car gets over to the R and M before the fan kicks on. Sometimes to help it along though I crank up the heater and roll down the windows, but that's not gonna happen when it finally starts getting up to 80 everyday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I talked to a Ford Mechanic before going with th 180. He said I wouldn't have any problems with it but not to go lower as the original is 192 it is only a 12 degree diff. As far as the radiator goes, I did replace it with the same , because I got it for 117.00 (new) and the 1st one lasted 116k. So if this one goes anothr 80 I'll be happy. So far it is running great.
 

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SHughes said:
I talked to a Ford Mechanic before going with th 180. He said I wouldn't have any problems with it but not to go lower as the original is 192 it is only a 12 degree diff.
You realize that your average Ford mechanic doesn't know sh*t about computer controls for the engine. If you want to use a lower temp thermostat the most likely only difference is reduced gas mileage...
 

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zzyzzx said:
You realize that your average Ford mechanic doesn't know sh*t about computer controls for the engine. If you want to use a lower temp thermostat the most likely only difference is reduced gas mileage...
Actually a Ford trained tech knows more about those computer controls than anyone on this board - and Ford trains a lot of them. That, and do you want performance, or do you want fuel economy? If you are interested in economy, give me a 200 stat. If you want performance, run a 160. And those computer controls will also pick up the differnces.
 

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birddog said:
zzyzzx said:
You realize that your average Ford mechanic doesn't know sh*t about computer controls for the engine. If you want to use a lower temp thermostat the most likely only difference is reduced gas mileage...
Actually a Ford trained tech knows more about those computer controls than anyone on this board - and Ford trains a lot of them. That, and do you want performance, or do you want fuel economy? If you are interested in economy, give me a 200 stat. If you want performance, run a 160. And those computer controls will also pick up the differnces.
I disagree. Both myself and probably siragain know more about computer controls than your average trained Ford tech on computer controls.
 

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I doubt that zz...siragan knows computers, but if you read what birddog said, you'd notice he said *THOSE* controls. Not just any computer controls. Besides I don't think either you or siragan have the diagnostic equipment to work on the computers like a trained Ford Mechanic working in a Ford shop would have. I'd much rather take my car to a shop where I can see the credentials and know they have had some professional training.

cocky people annoy me. My brother is the cockiest mofo you'll ever meet. So damn egotistical. I hate that. :x
 

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For example, I recently had a high idle problem, which I fixed by cleaning the electrical contacts on my coolant temperature sensor. Had I taken it to a mechanic, they most likely would have replaced my IAC on my first visit. Then mabybe replaced a vacuum hose on the second visit. then maybe given up on the third visit. Not sure how much that would have cost me but it would not be convenient or cheap. My other experiences dealing with the dealer mechanics for other warranty work (non-electrical) is equally disappointing.

As for my qualifications. I used to be an Electrical Engineer, and before that I was an electronice technician and did go to VO-tech school for 2 years for. And I also have another degree on computer science (yes I have multiple college degrees, one each from Ga Tech and U of Maryland). I'm much smarter than an auto mechanic and unlike real paid auto mechanics, I actually check the results of my work before I consider a job to be completed. I actually test drive the car. I doubt many "mechanics" actually do that.

When it comes to computer controls most mechanics are trained to just read the computer codes and go by the book. Problem with that is that often you don't get codes. Codes only get stores for a finite amount of time, like 40 starts, or something like that. Plus the condition has to exist for at least 6 seconds for it to be stored in the first place so forget about getting codes for an intermittent problem. Most actual mechanics think of things like spark plugs or spark plug wires when a car doesn'r run right. From what I've read on the internet, it seems like more people are having idleing problems due to vacuum leaks or unmetered air. Get with the times. Strangely enough most "mechanics" haven't. As far as real mechanice having more sophisticated tools, if you own a voltmeter you have most of what you need. I happen to have an oscilloscope, but haven't used it in years.

I slo do things like bench test sensors. It's real east to test any temperature sensor once removed from the car. I'll hook it to my voltmeter and aim my hair dryer at it and watch the resistance change. I also tested the potentiometer on my TPS with an extra wiring harness piece and my voltmeter again. Think a "mechanic" does this? Of course not! To most of them it's not bad unless they get a code.
 

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zzyzzx said:
Both myself and probably siragain know more about computer controls than your average trained Ford tech on computer controls.
Yeah, I will also vouch for the fact that I'm freakin' awesome :D

Lol.. I'm a sophmore mechanical engineer... I probably could understand the passive and active feedback and control systems of the escort, but I can't say I do. Give me a manual and a couple weeks and I'm sure I could figure it out, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
1st, I know quite a few mechanics and this is one of two I trust with computer control problems. I've owned this car (91GT) since it had 3 miles on it, and now at 116 plus k it hasn't ran this good in a long time. I've put close to 100 miles on it since going with the 180 degree t-stat and it seems to be working great. Thanks for everyones input though, Thats the reason I come here, to learn and get diff. opinions.
 

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I think that's great!! Good for you!!

Is your anger towards Ford mechanics, or just mechanics in general? You say things like "I doubt" and "most likely", like you don't have a clue if they do or not. I'm sure no one will ever meet your standards as a "Mechanic".

I have a friend who knows more about engines than anyone I've ever met . He has never been to VO-tech school, hell he didn't even finish high school, but is the most thorough mechanic I've ever had the opportunity to work on my rides.

Give that little horn of yours a rest. Thanks.
 

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The other benefit of being a Ford (or any other brand) mechanic is that you get to see more occurances of problems on those systems and cars. They live, eat, sleep and breath Ford cars. This helps out greatly when somehting that is an oddball problem pops up. They have the opportunity to work on these cars for years, and most likely could tell you a lot faster what is wrong. I personnally have a lot of knowledge about the Jeep Cherokee and the Grand Cherokee. We sold more of those than anything else at the car lot I wrenched at. Anyone can buy a scan tool from snap on or mac and start working, but in the dealerships, the equipment was designed for the cars they would be working on. you can beat that.
 

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zzyzzx said:
For example, I recently had a high idle problem, which I fixed by cleaning the electrical contacts on my coolant temperature sensor. Had I taken it to a mechanic, they most likely would have replaced my IAC on my first visit. Then mabybe replaced a vacuum hose on the second visit. then maybe given up on the third visit. Not sure how much that would have cost me but it would not be convenient or cheap. My other experiences dealing with the dealer mechanics for other warranty work (non-electrical) is equally disappointing.
It would usually help to let them know what the problems are and give them your overwhelmingly smart opinions on what it should be and how they should do their job. taking it in and going "fix it" would leave anyone guessing.
 

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:lol: oh this is a good one! i like what i've read so far..

i was planning to become a ford tech for a while, but turned it down for office work. 2 of my friends are techs at our local lincoln/mercury dealerships, and trust me, they were trained out their rear-ends on electrical systems. Saying a ford tech doens't know about your electrical system is like sayin' bill gates only plays solitare on win95.

As for your thermostat, throw whatever you want in their man. Computer's aren't dumb, and adjust your fuel curves to whatever temperature you're running. Generally, dropping a few degrees is a lil' safer and will "up" your performance a little. Honestly, i doubt you'll ever even notice a difference between the two, performance wise or mileage wise, it just looks "safer" with the needle on the N instead of the M, right? :) Have fun guys.
 
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