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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, sometimes the pulleys are pressed on and need a puller/presser to take on and off. Looking through the shop manual (official FoMoCo manual) I cannot find information on if I will need to obtain a puller kit to swap the pulley to a new pump. The service data says take the 3 bolts out of the pulley then remove it. It doesn't say how. Before I tear into this do I need a puller or is the pulley just bolted on, take off bolts and boom, pulley comes right off ready for the next pump? It's on a 95 wagon.

P.s. couldn't find any kind of how to after some searching here. If some one could point me to a thread already on this I'd be very appreciative!
 

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I just took a look at mine.. ('95 LX 4-door 1.9) and it's definitely bolted on, not pressed on. Looks like three bolts using a 10mm wrench or socket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HyBrad said:
I just took a look at mine.. ('95 LX 4-door 1.9) and it's definitely bolted on, not pressed on. Looks like three bolts using a 10mm wrench or socket.
Thats what it looks like but the remanned pumps I could get don't have a plate or something to bolt onto. I trust my parts guy for now but would like to know sure before I have to dig. So what do the bolts bolt to?
 

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After you remove the pulley (held on with the 3 small bolts) and get it wiggled off of the hub of the pump, then you can remove the pump from the engine accessory bracket. The -hub- is still on the p.s. pump shaft; Its what the pulley bolts to. It is a press-fit on the shaft. Unless you paid the higher price for a rebuilt/new pump having that hub on it, you will need to take the hub from your old one. I use a 3 jawed puller to do it. The end of the p.s. pump shaft is threaded inside. You need to fill that threaded hole with a bolt that matches the threads, (on mine it was something like a 5/16-18 bolt, not a metric size). This is so the screw-post of the puller has something to push against. I clamp the p.s. pump into my bench vise, turn the screw-post until its snug, then use a large & long screwdriver to hold the legs of the 3 jawed puller from turning. If you dont own a 3 jawed puller, you can probably rent one from a place like Autozone or Advanced Auto, etc.
Usually the new pump comes with a bolt and a nut. You put the nut onto the bolt and run it up near the head. Then you put a nice thick washer, then the hub, then you thread the bolt into the end of the shaft as far as it will go. Then the nut is used to draw the hub onto the shaft.
Sorry if I have been telling you the obvious, but other folks read these postings who may not know what you have to do to 'move' the hub to the new pump.
Of course you never ever hammer on the end of the p.s. pump shaft.

Anytime I am replacing a power steering pump, I make it a point to get some fluid into the pump, so the vanes inside it will be oiled when you first start the engine. Those vanes can get 'burnt' fairly quickly if they have to run 'dry'; and make the whining noise for thousands of miles.



If you dont own a pullery and go to buy one, I wouldnt advise buying an intexpensive one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the details. I was curious as to if there was some kind of hub plate. The Ford shop manual kinda sucks. (i.e. doesn't even have instructions on pulling the rear bumper) so it's not surprising it would lack a detailed blow up picture or worded instructions.

I thought there might be a hub plate to bolt it to but wanted to be sure before I took off on the mission. Didn't want to not have the right parts before I started and all. Thanks a ton!
 
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