Part numbers Relays 2nd Gen. | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Part numbers Relays 2nd Gen.

Discussion in 'Part Numbers' started by Specialk, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. Specialk

    Specialk FEOA Member

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    Hi, apparently the parts guy at my local Ford dealership is a idiot. He says I've lost him 2nd generation and 3rd Generation.
    He does not know the part number of the turn signal or horn relay.
    For all of us who have has the relay system out, and know what a pain in the butt it is to get a relay out when you have to pull the assembly out and coax the relays, knows how it also disables the lights etc.
    So he said the part number is not valid in my service manual. I need PART NUMBERS for a 91 1.9l escort sw turn signal relay and horn relay.
    In addition I need the same part numbers for a 94 escort 1.9 l sw
    I heard they are NOT the same. In addition the relays are missing from my 94 parts escort coupe...... figures. You can text me messages or post here for all to see. Thanks Gen2steve
  2. gen2steve

    gen2steve FEOA Member

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    Kelleigh,

    As I told you in our text exchange, I don't know the specific answers for a 1991 model year. You will get more responses and attention from members who are likely to speak with more authority on 1991 model year questions by starting a new thread in the second gen forum - it gets WAY more traffic than this forum.

    In general, I think going to the dealership is a lost cause. The parts are mostly all obsolete, and if by some miracle were in stock would be very expensive. You will be better served by going aftermarket or good used.

    Here is what I can tell you and show you about 1993 model year. Look and see if your connectors look like this on your 1991. If you can use the parts pictured, I'll send them to you.

    On my 1993 parts car, both the horn relay and flasher unit are side-by-side under the dash, outboard (to the left of) the steering column and outboard of other relay-like devices in the same area. I had little problem removing the relay and flasher singly, with no tools whatsoever.

    The 1993 horn relay has 5 pins, with a yellow connector with 6 positions, only 4 of which contain wires. This means that one post of the relay has no wire. Sorry for the blurry shots - I was having trouble with the macro setting doing what I wanted.
    DSCN3382.JPG

    DSCN3383.JPG DSCN3384.JPG



    On my 1993 parts car, the flasher serves both the directional signals and the emergency flashers. It is a three [spade] pin unit, although the spade arrangement is different than the "standard" three spade aftermarket flashers I have seen. The connector is white, and has three wires (duh).

    DSCN3385.JPG DSCN3386.JPG DSCN3387.JPG

    Text or call or email me (don't reply in this thread), if you have connectors like this in your 1991, so I can mail these to you.
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
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  3. gen2steve

    gen2steve FEOA Member

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    For 1994, the horn relay is exactly the same (five spades, four wires) in the exact same location as the 1993.

    The 1994 flasher is different from the 1993, but is located in the same general area, closer to the firewall. It has a black connector with 8 positions, one of which is blanked out and "idiot proof". The other 7 positions have wires. Like the 1993, it fulfills both directional signal and four-way flasher duty.

    DSCN3393.JPG DSCN3395.JPG DSCN3398.JPG DSCN3399.JPG

    Here is an underdash shot of the 1994, with the flasher and horn relay in place.
    The flasher is the rightmost unit, and the horn relay yellow connector stands out plainly.
    DSCN3401.JPG
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  4. gen2steve

    gen2steve FEOA Member

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    In all cases, the relays and flashers slide onto metal tabs that stay with the vehicle.

    NO TOOLS ARE REQUIRED to remove any of them.

    The horn relay is on a horizontal metal tab, and should be slid to the left to remove.
    The same is true of the 1993 flasher.

    The 1994 flasher is on a vertical tab, and should be slid downward to remove.
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  5. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    The dealer probably doesn't know or use the terms first or second generation Escort, and is unfamiliar with 25+ year old cars.
    Also he is aware that people with these kinds of cars may buy small items for a few bucks, but if he goes to the trouble of finding an obscure part that turns out to be twenty or fifty bucks, the customer will not pay.
    So you have to be very patient and polite to get one of the parts people to go above and beyond (from their point of view) to indulge your Escort enthusiasm.
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  6. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    Junkyards are a great place to find the parts you need without the hassle of having to find the part number. While they may not last forever the stock parts are almost always better than aftermarket parts and, even though they are 20+ years old they tend to outlive their aftermarket counterparts.

    John
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  7. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I hope this wont just add to confusion: I dont find any mention of the turn signal relay. In the diagrams in the Electrical and Vacuum Troubleshooting Manual (EVTM) for my 92 Escort it is just called an "electronic flasher". When the turn signal lever is moved down or up, it is connected to the turn signals; (with the left side chosen when the lever is pulled down and vice versa when the lever is pushed up). That flasher relay has a 'base' part number of 13350. The Horn Relay has a base # of 13853. These numbers and their names are the same in my 1993 EVTM.
    Both of these 5 digits numbers turned up on a search for their names and numbers at Amazon(dot)com. Unfortunately without the entire part number you could still get a wrong part, i.e. for a different Ford product. Most Ford part numbers include a 4 digit prefix, like F1CZ, then the five digit 'base' number, and maybe a suffix indcating a newer or improved item. And nope, the part number prefixes for all of the parts in one Esocrt will not be the same. The prefix indicates when that part came into FoMoCo use, not how many later applications it may have had.
    Looking in the EVTM for my 1993 Escort gave me the same two numbers, 13350 and 13853, for the same named parts. But again, with no prefix indicated.
    Going to rockauto(dot)com and putting in the info for a Ford, 1991 Escort, allowed me to type "horn relay" and "flasher relay" into the search box, and listings were displayed. They mostly had small images of the part, and clicking on the image would enlarge it. So you would be able to tell if the pins were the right layout. They used the part number from the current manufacturer, not the OEM Ford number and name.
    F1CZ" Means it was from the 90's (the F), its first year of use was 91 (the 1), the model of car was Escort (the C). Its not clear to me what the "Z" means.
    A few years back I had some good results with one of the countermen at the Ford dealer nearest to me in zip code 22312. Rather than just tell me it was obsolete, he would type into his terminal keyboard, searching by whatever info I had, and would sometimes find that a Ford dealer elsewhere in the USA had one of them on the shelf. Then I could order it in, pay for it, and have my part. They were not discounted, but often I didnt care. He did this for me for two summers, then moved on to grace some other job or location. The other countermen would type in the description, tell me it was obsolete, and go back to whatever they did out of sight in the racks behind the counter.
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  8. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    I had the same salesmanship when I was fixing up an early (1969) Corolla with a friend years ago. The unhelpful parts guy just said the part was no longer available.
    The part was a countershaft for a transmission. My friend ended up having a machine shop make up a new shaft and some bronze bushings which did the job, but at a fair expense.

    Happily I met another parts man there who was pleased that I was working on these old Corollas, and would take the time to search out the parts I wanted and send messages to Japan or wherever, and a few days later would contact me with prices.
    He gave me a good discount too, so I ordered all kinds of little bits for a couple of cars.
    Not surprisingly, he found the countershaft was actually available at significant less cost than the cost of having the new part made up.

    I once read that a car dealership doesn't want to talk to you if your car is more than ten years old. I suppose there is some business sense in this, but in other ways, certainly not.
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  9. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I recall that dealerships were required (by law) to stock parts to keep their products running - until they are ten years old. After that its up to them to decide what they stock, or even have listings for.
    I know that parts from the dealerships were available for the English Ford Anglia's, until they were ten years old - by which time Ford had stopped selling new ones. The aftermarket for the Anglia's was never good. I imagine the dealerships were super glad to get out of the business of selling parts for cheap little cars that were not reliable.

    The service manual for my 64 Anglia, after saying the engine was "long-wearing and robust", recommended changing the rod and main bearings every 50k miles.!...which I had to do to mine. It also had a Lucas electrical system (!!), which had a positive ground, not the usual negative ground.
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