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I've talked about this car on here before and if you look on my old posts you'll find what the car used to look like and the story. To summarize: This car has an interesting back story because of me and I feel attached to it in an emotional weird way.

Anyway, this is the car now and the only thing left of the engine is the bottom pieces, the pan, and the block with the pistons now rusted. The old engine locked up and I tore it down to that. Including removing the radiator and cooler in the very front, of which I broke the metal lines. The car has absolutely NO rust on it anywhere except one of the motor mounts and a little spot behind the fender. The car's body itself has a few very small dings on the back from the crow bar, which you guys will know about if you know the sick story. At some point in the winter I painted it black and after the engine locked up I bought a 93 escort interior and put it in and new front end panels and bumpers.

My question. I would love to try putting an engine in it and put it back white and restore it as best I can. The issue is what it needs other than mechanical: suspension, control arm, wipers, windshield has a small line crack, head lights, turn signals, tail lights, grill, rims, tires, carpet, headliner, radio and speakers, rear wiper components, and some white spray paint and clear coat. What do you guys think I should do, send it to become a coke can, or fix it.
 

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If you source most of the parts from the junkyard, you can definitely save it.
 

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I can understand being emotionally attached to a particular vehicle. I've been there a couple times in my life, and dumped lots of time, energy, and money just to keep something running that I knew wasn't safe to drive anymore.

But try to take a step back to rationalize spending $1500 (or whatever amount) repairing a vehicle that will be worth less than that when you're done.
 

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I can understand being emotionally attached to a particular vehicle. I've been there a couple times in my life, and dumped lots of time, energy, and money just to keep something running that I knew wasn't safe to drive anymore.

But try to take a step back to rationalize spending $1500 (or whatever amount) repairing a vehicle that will be worth less than that when you're done.
I agree but then again I can find complete 2nd and 3rd gens in rust free shape all day long out here in Cali for cheap so I'm biased. Find another 2nd gen and use the one you have as a parts car for whatever may be missing.

John
 

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When he said it was largely rust free - I figured that would make it worth the time and trouble for his own satisfaction. Rust free older cars are a rare commodity here in northern VA. I do most of my own work, and drive the resulting vehicle. That is a very good feeling for me, maybe its even selfish. Its market value is of no of interest. I very much care that the vehicle be a pleasure for my wife and I to use.
When any car has gotten to be 20+ years old - I dont think in terms of just fixing one or two existing problems and expecting to drive it for daily use. I plan on more like a mini-restoration; fixing a spectrum of current and predicted future problems.
It sure helps to be retired and have the time, the tools, the location; and a spare Escort for driving to get parts that the FEDEX and UPS drivers dont hand me in the driveway.
 

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If you lived in Texas, they dont care about general windshield cracks. Some cars on the road have 8 to 10 cracks wandering across the windshield.
 

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Years ago I was in Edmonton, a fairly large city in Canada. Most of the cars had cracked windshields. They had just passed a law requiring dumptrucks to cover their loads, which was hoped to reduce the problem.
But the "sand" they put down on the roads in winter was actually sand and gravel, so that will still be a big problem. Annoying how someone will decide to save a couple dollars per ton to use sand with the occasional pebble, rather than proper screened sand.
"I save ten dollars on sand, ten people get cracked windshields".
 

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An important driving rule, is "Never to follow close behind dump trucks". Just one small bump, and every dump truck on the road is likely to have a chunk of gravel come flying out of the bed, hit the ground once, and be airborne about windshield height.

In south Texas, every truck will have been on a dirt/gravel road recently. As soon as they pull onto the expressway (its now called I-2), and speed up; little rocks will be coming out of the treads.

Avoiding tailgating trucks seems to be beyond the thinking of drivers in TX.
Yes Cuňados, I mean you!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Update on this as well: The car was sold to a guy who lives in Maryland for $200. He plans on using it for his engine since his sedan is too rusted to drive. The car’s body has absolutely 0 rust so he’s going to drop his engine in and spray bomb it.
 
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