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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It's listed for $250 or "make offer":


I don't know why that link is six lines long...

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I were in the US and not Canada, I would seriously consider buying that head. Really, $250 is not a lot of money nowadays. How much will it cost to get a head remanufactured?

I found a head a few years ago that was really cool, now I wish I had bought it. It was a bare service replacement head for the 1.9 HO, cast in 1995 and with a 1994 casting number:

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I talked about this head a bit in posts numbers #75 and 76 in the fantastic thread "The Guide to U.S. [and Canada] First Gen Cylinder Heads." found here:

 

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I dont know anything about first gen escort heads. All of the engine heads I found on my 2nd gen X escorts or bought from rebuilders had a casting # ending in B7A. In the photo I dont see the passage for the cam position sensor in the G7D head.. Also the B7A has a 2nd opening into the water jacket on the side toward the transmission, and I cant tell if the one in the photos has that. You can see into the interior of the head.
 

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I dont know anything about first gen escort heads. All of the engine heads I found on my 2nd gen X escorts or bought from rebuilders had a casting # ending in B7A. In the photo I dont see the passage for the cam position sensor in the G7D head.. Also the B7A has a 2nd opening into the water jacket on the side toward the transmission, and I cant tell if the one in the photos has that. You can see into the interior of the head.
First gen heads don’t have a cam position sensor. But one could possibly use the fuel pump mounting spot to rig one up. But then you'd have to deal with low compression from the second gen pistons so it’s probably not a worthwhile swap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
True, the late first generation heads don't have the Camshaft position / Fuel pump hole drilled.
However a clever guy could make up a jig to do that. The boss and threaded holes are in exactly the same place as on the second gen heads.

Interestingly, the hole is not in the exact middle of the bolt holes, it's 0.10" off. This mounting spot is the only non-metric legacy I found on the heads, it's exactly 2" bolt spacing, C to C, presumably a relic of an earlier fuel pump design.

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Edit:

I highly recommend the thread "Guide to first gen heads" to everyone, even those that don't have a first gen car. The research and information that Scortster provided are amazing, it would be difficult or impossible to acquire that information now, thirty to forty years after these engines were made.
 

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If the head didnt have the hole drilled for a cam position sensor, would the corresponding camshaft have the necessary 'nub' on it?
Having held a number of 2nd gen camshafts in my hands, I dont recall if there was a raised spot to trigger a signal for the position of the cam.
 

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If the head didnt have the hole drilled for a cam position sensor, would the corresponding camshaft have the necessary 'nub' on it?
Having held a number of 2nd gen camshafts in my hands, I dont recall if there was a raised spot to trigger a signal for the position of the cam.
No, fist gen cams don’t have a nub for the sensor, but a second gen cam can be swapped out in the head, not that it be worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The second generation camshafts have a lobe to trigger the sensor, and it sure looks like a fuel pump eccentric, which it probably copies since the early first generation camshafts would have had such a lobe.

This is of interest if one wanted to use a GT camshaft or entire head in a second generation Escort, as the GT cam has no lobe or lump or anything else to trigger the sensor. No doubt a clever guy could add one.
 

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The second generation camshafts have a lobe to trigger the sensor, and it sure looks like a fuel pump eccentric, which it probably copies since the early first generation camshafts would have had such a lobe.

This is of interest if one wanted to use a GT camshaft or entire head in a second generation Escort, as the GT cam has no lobe or lump or anything else to trigger the sensor. No doubt a clever guy could add one.
I only seen one second gen, the cam censer lobe was hardly a lobe. More like a finger or something. Only early fist gen carbed motor have the mech fuel pump lobe btw. That being said, the lobes are pressed on so I bet its not out of the realm of possibility to put the cam censor lobe onto a first gen ho cam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well the camshafts I've looked at from 1992-95 1.9 engines had a lobe that looked just like a fuel pump eccentric, not a finger or pointer type trigger as might be expected. Which kind of surprised me, as the lobe couldn't trigger a sensor very precisely, leading me to conclude the sensor isn't used for timing, just for telling the computer if the engine is on firing stroke vs. exhaust stroke.

The precise timing is done by the crank position sensor, but since the crank turns twice for each complete engine cycle, the cam sensor is needed for the computer to know what stroke the engine is on, but it doesn't need to be very precise.
 

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Well the camshafts I've looked at from 1992-95 1.9 engines had a lobe that looked just like a fuel pump eccentric, not a finger or pointer type trigger as might be expected. Which kind of surprised me, as the lobe couldn't trigger a sensor very precisely, leading me to conclude the sensor isn't used for timing, just for telling the computer if the engine is on firing stroke vs. exhaust stroke.

The precise timing is done by the crank position sensor, but since the crank turns twice for each complete engine cycle, the cam sensor is needed for the computer to know what stroke the engine is on, but it doesn't need to be very precise.
I'm a fist gen guy, only seen one second gen cam, heck it could have been a 3rd gen cam for all I know. I'll get a photo of the cam as well when I go down to the old garage.
 

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What's up with all the poor answers for the guy?

The cams are ALL ground from casted/forged material (casted then ground for flat-tappet lifters, forged to some degree then ground for rollers), nothing is pressed onto them

Only the carb models (81-86) have fuel pump lobes (1.6 EFI & Turbo cams might too, haven't pulled mine yet), and it is simply an eccentric circle - meaning it's a 1.75"ish round band ground offset into the end of the cam where the fuel pump pushrod can ride.

The 91+ cams (91-96 for sure) have just a little tab (about 0.25" x 0.30") sticking out of the location where the fuel pump lobe would normally be. Supposedly the 2.0 cams should be the same but I haven't held any first hand.

I do have though EVERY 81-96 CVH camshaft though so what I say is 100% accurate & reliable here
 

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What's up with all the poor answers for the guy?

The cams are ALL ground from casted/forged material (casted then ground for flat-tappet lifters, forged to some degree then ground for rollers), nothing is pressed onto them

Only the carb models (81-86) have fuel pump lobes (1.6 EFI & Turbo cams might too, haven't pulled mine yet), and it is simply an eccentric circle - meaning it's a 1.75"ish round band ground offset into the end of the cam where the fuel pump pushrod can ride.

The 91+ cams (91-96 for sure) have just a little tab (about 0.25" x 0.30") sticking out of the location where the fuel pump lobe would normally be. Supposedly the 2.0 cams should be the same but I haven't held any first hand.

I do have though EVERY 81-96 CVH camshaft though so what I say is 100% accurate & reliable here
And I had and or worked with just about every cam from 86-90, the roller cams all had lobes pressed on to a hallow core. Heck I had worked on a 87 were one of the lobes became loose and had moved about 40 degrees. I ended up with the cam and took off all the lobes off to re use them for forging a few knifes.

Now that's not to say all escort cams are this way as I have not seen one flat lifter cam with pressed on lobes. All of the flat lifter cams I dealt with were cast and milled.
 
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