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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I would like to say hello, and thanks in advance for any help you guys can give.

Secondly, I would love to find the person who came up with the idea of a transversely mounted engine and tranny and beat them with a water hose.


Now, I'm replacing the trans axle in my grandmothers 93 lx wagon. After looking everything over we discovered that the tranny we bought has had the TV cable cut off. My question is, how do we replace the cable.
 

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It will require removing the tranny oil pan for sure, and (according to the Service Manual), also dropping the valve body. It would be easier if the tranny is not in the car yet, but it can still be done with the tranny installed.

Rebuilt trannies supposedly come with a little pin inserted in the upper of two holes in the front of the case, just below where the Throttle Valve cable goes in. The upper hole is to allow you to lock the throttle pulley inside the tranny so it wont rotate -- and will be in a position so its easier to get the new throttle cable in place. So before you take the old throttle cable remnant out, take out that pin, pull up on the cable, and slide a nail or small rod into the hole. You should be able to feel when it goes into the locking hole in the side of the throttle pulley. Then, with the pan off, and by unscrewing and removing the solenoid that is right under that spot (but not removing the valve body), you -might- be able to work the old t.v. cable 'end' out of its pocket in the throttle pulley and the cable out of the slot running down the middle of that pulley. If so you can probably also get the new cable in. Long-long needle nosed pliers might work here.
If there still isnt enough room, you would have to unbolt the throttle body and bring it down. Be Really Careful about lowering it. There is a large thin paper gasket running across the middle layer of the valve body, and its ends seal the several holes holes for ATF going from the throttle body and up into the case of the tranny. Its easy to have this part of the paper gasket break - then you would have to either replace the entire paper gasket (which involves dismantling the throttle body) or making up small pieces of gasket paper to seal the holes. I have rebuilt two of these trannies: In one of them the paper gasket came apart when I unbolted the valve body; on the other it stayed in one piece.


As for transverse drivetrains, I prefer working on most of them, finding it easier than on many cars with longitudnal drivetrains. The first transverse engines/trannies go back to 1905 or earlier. The first large scale production Buicks for instance (in 1905), all had transverse engines, as did many other early makes.
I have a G20 Chevy Sportvan, and working on its drivetrain I find a lot more troublesome than working on my Escort. There have been some more annoying layouts too; the Dodge A100 vans in the 60s, and the early Toyota Previas (80's), with the engine nestled between the driver and passenger. The later Previa vans (90's) had the motor under the driver's seat.

If you cant save the old throttle valve cable from the original transmission, I would be glad to know where you find a new or used throttle valve cable assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for all the info, seems like it should be fairly simple (I hope). I still have both trannies sitting on my garage floor, I wasn't about to try and tackle this after i got the replacement tranny in. As for buying a new cable, I hope I don't screw up the cable on the old tranny. I checked with Autozone and they told me they dont stock or carry TV cables for the Escorts. So it looks like a dealer only or a boneyard part if I need to get a new one.



sorry, I dont have any pics of the cable that I can post.

the cable on the replacement tranny was cut almost at the half way point, so Ive got plenty of cable I can work with to get it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
with the exception of working in a confined space, this was extremely easy to complete. I didnt even need to remove the valve body, just one sensor that was over the cam the the tv cable hooks onto. It only took about 15 minutes to remove both cables and then install the good cable onto my new trans axle.

Thanks for the help, I wouldnt have known where to even look to find where the cam was inside .
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the trans axle isnt in the car at the moment, thats why it only took about 15 minutes. If it was in the car, it would have been about 45min to an hour to swap out the tv cable.
 
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