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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1993 Escort SW 1.9 stick shift, 247K miles.

Even after dozens of opening and closings, the VSS is still a bear to get out, so I grin and bear it, ha... so no questions on that, but I'm losing WAAAY too much fluid, and adding a qt "all the time".... some people tell me they think it's the O-Ring on the VSS and I want to try that, as well as listen to your other ideas. Has anybody found an easy source for that O-Ring?

I live in a large apt complex, so there is oil/grease in all the parking spaces, so my "drips" if any cannot be seen.

I haven't been here for a LOOONG time, so I couldn't find the new SEARCH box, so it this has been addressed recently, I apologize.

thx,

LarryR
 

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Glad to hear from you larirudi:
The source for a new "O"ring on the VSS would be another VSS, or any assortment box of "O" rings. But I doubt that is your leak source. There is a seal on the shaft going out the back of the trans, to the shifting rods. That could be leaking - and if it is, good luck trying to find someone the replace it. (If I had to replace one of them I would figure on taking the trans out, and trying to buy the special seal removal tool......because the shaft running through it is almost as big as the outer diameter of the seal). Another possible spot would be the stamped steel cover over the far end of the transmission - on the driver's side. This thin steel cover can rust and develop a leak. It can be unbolted and repaired - with something like brazing rod. It would also need a new paper seal between it and the trans case. You might have to have the wheel off, and the antisplash plastic item on that wheel well removed. (none of those still exist on my escorts).

And yes it is a sore chore to get the VSS out. I have two 5-speed escorts, and I check the fluid level about annually. I take out the battery and battery tray to be able to reach down there with less difficulty. Each time after taking out the small bolt and clamping 'fork', I wiggle the VSS while pullling up. I often dont bother to remove the speedo cable or the connection for the PCM. I always file off any corrosion and apply a new coating of antiseize compound. In the case of both of these cars, which spent their life in VA/MD where salt is used on the roads in the winter, getting the VSS out the first time happened -after I had hoisted out the engine and trans together- and had the trans lying helpless on my workbench. And it still took a scary amount of work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Glad to hear from you larirudi:
The source for a new "O"ring on the VSS would be another VSS, or any assortment box of "O" rings. But I doubt that is your leak source. There is a seal on the shaft going out the back of the trans, to the shifting rods. That could be leaking - and if it is, good luck trying to find someone the replace it. (If I had to replace one of them I would figure on taking the trans out, and trying to buy the special seal removal tool......because the shaft running through it is almost as big as the outer diameter of the seal). Another possible spot would be the stamped steel cover over the far end of the transmission - on the driver's side. This thin steel cover can rust and develop a leak. It can be unbolted and repaired - with something like brazing rod. It would also need a new paper seal between it and the trans case. You might have to have the wheel off, and the antisplash plastic item on that wheel well removed. (none of those still exist on my escorts).

And yes it is a sore chore to get the VSS out. I have two 5-speed escorts, and I check the fluid level about annually. I take out the battery and battery tray to be able to reach down there with less difficulty. Each time after taking out the small bolt and clamping 'fork', I wiggle the VSS while pullling up. I often dont bother to remove the speedo cable or the connection for the PCM. I always file off any corrosion and apply a new coating of antiseize compound. In the case of both of these cars, which spent their life in VA/MD where salt is used on the roads in the winter, getting the VSS out the first time happened -after I had hoisted out the engine and trans together- and had the trans lying helpless on my workbench. And it still took a scary amount of work.

The VSS removal fun, yes, I've done it so many times it oughta be LOOSE and easy to lift out, but no...... so I remove the locking 9 or 10 mm bolt that hold the "holding fork" in place, jiggle the VSS and lift at the same time, hafta talk to it a little and then finally get maybe a 1/32 inch rise so I can get a thin screwdriver between the VSS and the case, then pry GENTLY while lifting and jiggling the VSS until it finally pops out; LIFT and JIGGLE a LOT.

So I'm going to pursue your other ideas; got snowed in in Denver the 13, 14th and finally out the afternoon of the 15th, ha.

thx,

LarryR
 
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The rubber "O" ring on the neck of the VSS makes it hard to get it out. But leaving our the :"O" ring would likely result in a constant mess of trans fluid in that area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The rubber "O" ring on the neck of the VSS makes it hard to get it out. But leaving our the :"O" ring would likely result in a constant mess of trans fluid in that area.
Agree, I'd never be tempted to do that......... Getting the VSS out, even though it's not easy, I've done it SO MANY TIMES that I can get it out in minutes. My life is so busy [no I'm not an important figure, just trying to keep my head above water] that I couldn't respond quicker, so next post is going to provide a lot of photos that might be helpful to others if they want to see the tranny from various angles; I'm hoping you can point out the area that you think might be leaking.
Later,
LarryR
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Glad to hear from you larirudi:
The source for a new "O"ring on the VSS would be another VSS, or any assortment box of "O" rings. But I doubt that is your leak source. There is a seal on the shaft going out the back of the trans, to the shifting rods. That could be leaking - and if it is, good luck trying to find someone the replace it. (If I had to replace one of them I would figure on taking the trans out, and trying to buy the special seal removal tool......because the shaft running through it is almost as big as the outer diameter of the seal). Another possible spot would be the stamped steel cover over the far end of the transmission - on the driver's side. This thin steel cover can rust and develop a leak. It can be unbolted and repaired - with something like brazing rod. It would also need a new paper seal between it and the trans case. You might have to have the wheel off, and the antisplash plastic item on that wheel well removed. (none of those still exist on my escorts).

And yes it is a sore chore to get the VSS out. I have two 5-speed escorts, and I check the fluid level about annually. I take out the battery and battery tray to be able to reach down there with less difficulty. Each time after taking out the small bolt and clamping 'fork', I wiggle the VSS while pullling up. I often dont bother to remove the speedo cable or the connection for the PCM. I always file off any corrosion and apply a new coating of antiseize compound. In the case of both of these cars, which spent their life in VA/MD where salt is used on the roads in the winter, getting the VSS out the first time happened -after I had hoisted out the engine and trans together- and had the trans lying helpless on my workbench. And it still took a scary amount of work.
I don't know if I can get all the photos on one post, maybe it'll take two. Anyways, this is the Gold 1993 I bought years ago, totaled the front end, and just HAD to save the engine, tranny etc..... so here are some photos that you might be able to show me your idea on the most likely leaking area.... Here goes....
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PXL_20210320_210933678.jpg
PXL_20210320_211004251.jpg
PXL_20210320_211032252.jpg
PXL_20210320_211102563.jpg
PXL_20210320_211116057.jpg
PXL_20210320_211121925.jpg
PXL_20210320_211136813.jpg
PXL_20210320_211159784.jpg
PXL_20210320_211202467.jpg
PXL_20210320_211234814.jpg
PXL_20210320_210933678.jpg
PXL_20210320_211004251.jpg
PXL_20210320_211032252.jpg
PXL_20210320_211102563.jpg
PXL_20210320_211116057.jpg
PXL_20210320_211121925.jpg
PXL_20210320_211136813.jpg
PXL_20210320_211159784.jpg
PXL_20210320_211202467.jpg
PXL_20210320_211234814.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Glad to hear from you larirudi:
The source for a new "O"ring on the VSS would be another VSS, or any assortment box of "O" rings. But I doubt that is your leak source. There is a seal on the shaft going out the back of the trans, to the shifting rods. That could be leaking - and if it is, good luck trying to find someone the replace it. (If I had to replace one of them I would figure on taking the trans out, and trying to buy the special seal removal tool......because the shaft running through it is almost as big as the outer diameter of the seal). Another possible spot would be the stamped steel cover over the far end of the transmission - on the driver's side. This thin steel cover can rust and develop a leak. It can be unbolted and repaired - with something like brazing rod. It would also need a new paper seal between it and the trans case. You might have to have the wheel off, and the antisplash plastic item on that wheel well removed. (none of those still exist on my escorts).

And yes it is a sore chore to get the VSS out. I have two 5-speed escorts, and I check the fluid level about annually. I take out the battery and battery tray to be able to reach down there with less difficulty. Each time after taking out the small bolt and clamping 'fork', I wiggle the VSS while pullling up. I often dont bother to remove the speedo cable or the connection for the PCM. I always file off any corrosion and apply a new coating of antiseize compound. In the case of both of these cars, which spent their life in VA/MD where salt is used on the roads in the winter, getting the VSS out the first time happened -after I had hoisted out the engine and trans together- and had the trans lying helpless on my workbench. And it still took a scary amount of work.
I could only do 10 on a post, so here are the remaining four.
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51266
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PXL_20210320_211237689.jpg
PXL_20210320_211242124.jpg
PXL_20210320_211307058.jpg
PXL_20210320_211310303.jpg
 

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Its nice to see the photos of a more or less clean escort 5-speed. You have so many photos that I will make my comments/guess based on the first one. On the left of the trans you see the small rubber bellows? That is the shaft that goes in and out and rotates as you shift gears. With the bellows pushed aside you will find a small bolt, the removal of which allows removing the trans from the shifting rods that run back to the shift lever. There is a seal where the shaft goes into the trans, and its inner end is submerged in trans fluid. So if that seal is bad, you would have a continuous leak.
The other end of the trans, on the right side in the first photo, shows the stamped sheet metal cover for the end of the trans. This cover can get rusty, and leak. It also would leak if sealant wasnt applied carefully where it bolts onto the end of the aluminum of the trans case.
Sadly to say, but neither of these leak locations can be reached/repaired easily.
 

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I think the other sources of leaks will be the CV shaft seals and the input shaft seal. These are available on Rockauto, although the listings are a bit confusing.

I'd like to obtain the shift lever/shaft seal so I could replace all the seals when I have my transmission out. Any idea of a part number and/or source for that?
 

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I checked at rockauto for the manual transmission of a 93 LX escort. All the 2nd gen escorts LXs use the same 5-speed. They show "shift shaft seals", which seem to have the right dimensions, along with part numbers. If you click on the 'info' button some of the info listings give dimensions and alternate and OEM part numbers. I think the picture for the SKF seal must be the wrong image.
 

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Thanks, Denisond.
For some reason I didn't notice the "Shift Shaft Seal" when I ordered last time from Rockauto.
Rockauto lists "Drive axle seals" as well as "Main / Output Shaft Seals". I ordered the latter in two brands to see which is better. I am guessing that the "Drive Axle Seals" are at the wheel bearings, but Rockauto's terminology is unclear to me.

If I ever do the resealing of the transaxle I'll post it in the "How To" section.

I did notice that the images of the Shift Shaft Seals show apparently differently sized seals. Which one(s) do you think are the correct ones?
 

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The shaft would seem to be the .630" diameter, and the hole the seal goes into being the roughly 1.18" size. So after checking the '"info" buttons in the rockauto listing, I would buy either the National or BCA or Timken. The SKF image is clearly wrong, and the dimensions dont seem just right (for bore diameter).
If shaft removal is required for seal replacement, you would need to have the transmission case separated and some of the innards removed. In the Service Manual I they show a special seal remover (D80-100-? collet) for that seal. The drawing doesnt have much detail.
If you were able to have the shift shaft still in pace, then the collet would have to fit over the shaft, and expand enough to be pulling on the metal part of the seal.
On ebay there is a set called "16 pcs blind pilot internal extractor/remover bearing puller set with case".
The set is only $53 with shipping, and I would buy it - IF I thought there was a collet in it that would fit into that 1.18" hole, over the .610 shaft, and be able to extract the "shift shaft seal". There is another similar set, ebay # 353352036330, that does list its collet sizes. The ones that might fit, I guess would be the 13-23mm or 18-23mm sizes.
If any members have an idea if one of these collets would fit, I would be glad to know of it. Am always happy to have more nifty tools.
 

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The shop manual isn't clear about whether the shift shaft can be removed from the outside, but it doesn't look likely.
It would be a real hassle to separate the transaxle halves in order to get the shift shaft out, just to replace that seal. I think I'd just live with a leak there.
 

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The axle shaft seals are the most common leak point and can be replaced without removing the trans, provided the axle shafts will come out of the transmission. Other seals require trans removal and some degree of disassembly. I did not see a post that the leak had been identified. Has this car been up in the air to actually see where the drips are coming fronm?
 

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Eventually the CV shafts need to be replaced, so that's a good time to change those seals.
When replacing the clutch, it's a good time to change the rear main and trans input shaft seals.

I have new clutch discs from Rockauto for most of the cars in the family fleet, waiting for when the old ones wears out.

I used to service the CV joints, but nowadays I think it makes more sense to simply buy entire new cheap Chinese ones.
 

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................ I haven't been here for a LOOONG time, so I couldn't find the new SEARCH box, so it this has been addressed recently, I apologize. .....
Dude! I remember you! Welcome back! 👍😁

I haven't ready the thread yet and Denisond3 probably already mentioned it, but those sensors if they leak, will leak internally; the result of which is fluiding exiting from the back of the speedometer and lubing your shoes. If you're not getting any trans fluid in the passenger cabin then check your axle seals.
 

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If you plan on keeping the car long. Consider locating axle shafts with the hard plastic c/v boots, they last longer than the softer flexible rubber ones.
 

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I reviewed the listings at Rock auto for 93 1.9L all the shafts listed have neoprene boots listed. The boot kits appear to neoprene also. I usually buy from NAPA or CARQUEST, Cardonne is the most common axle I remember getting. They are also neoprene. Neoprene appears to be the material of choice for non oem c/v boots. Current Toyota or Ford axles are or have been for some time the harder plastic. Unless the description of the part would state otherwise it would appear neoprene is the only choice. My appologies for recommending something not available in this vintage of car. The price of the axles is very low compared to my local parts house. So I guess we have to live with c/v boots cracking between the folds.
 
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