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I suspect that tire just came off the front. Is your other tire worn on the inside a bit more than the outside and split on the seam too? It looks like you'd toed out a bit too much. Might want to toe-in (back your outer tie rod end OUT one turn) or just plain have your alignment checked.
 

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highanddry said:
I suspect that tire just came off the front. Is your other tire worn on the inside a bit more than the outside and split on the seam too? It looks like you'd toed out a bit too much. Might want to toe-in (back your outer tie rod end OUT one turn) or just plain have your alignment checked.
It's not toe, it's camber that he's got wrong.

With toe-in problems, you look at the place where the tread of the tire raises, if you've got wear marks on one side of a seam that is smooth along the edge, and the other edge is jagged, then you've got toe problems. If you've got wear along the inner edge, it's just camber/high speed cornering issues.

Also, negative camber is a bunch of hype. Positive caster, on the other hand...

I've found that the best handling in an EGT can be achieved with lots of positive caster and only *slight* negative camber.

It's a common misconception that more negative camber will improve handling. I've found that it hurts it. A lot. The trick if getting the maximum amount of rubber to touch the road at all times, and usually, you don't need a lot of negative camber to do that, and if you go too far, then you're putting less rubber on the road, which is why it hurts it so much.

So I suggest making your camber a bit more positive and you'll notice a WORLD of difference.
 

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I knew someone would correct me and say the cause of the excessive wear on the inner part of the tire was negative camber. That's what all the books say and I completely agree that on a new vehicle this is how negative camber will wear the tire.

However, my experience is that if both tires exhibit this wear pattern on an older, well used car (like most people here own), the tie-rod ends (and actually the bearings) are to blame. Without purposely doing it, it is hard to mess up camber and caster on the Escorts, even if you replace springs and struts. Escorts are manufactured with a slight positive camber. So to have inner edge wear from negative camber is unlikely. On the other hand, it is very easy to incorrectly toe your front wheels and the outer tie-rod ends on Escorts are definitely the weakeast part of the steering/suspension package.

I actually purposely proved this (because I didn't believe it myself) with new tires and by purposely toeing out both front tires equally. It is amazing how a little toe problem can really wear your tires fast.

I convinced myself that old/worn bearings, combined with toe-out create the effect of negative caster.

So, if you don't want to go through the hassle of replacing bearings, try toeing in a bit. Ghetto? I dunno, but your tires will last longer.

Regardless of this exercise, the smartest thing is to have your alignment checked; your tires will last longer, your ride will be smoother and quieter and you may even notice better economy.

No disrespect Siragan; you know your stuff and I'd be hard pressed to challenge any of your advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
All the bearings have been replaced... I wll get an alignment when I get them mounted.. I have been sliding around many turns the last 2 months :D
 

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highanddry said:
No disrespect Siragan; you know your stuff and I'd be hard pressed to challenge any of your advice.
You're right about how toe-out can create similar wear patterns as negative camber, but by looking at his tires, he doesn't have the classic "frayed edge" on the trailing edge of the tread. Although, now that I think about it, the reason for this is probably because he has the high performance tires.

I'm used to reading the plain-jane all-season tires, and the trailing edge of them usually has a "fray" when your toe is too negative. However, with the "higher density" racing tires, they probably don't fray like the cheapos I've got on my car. meh.

good point though.
 

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Looks just like my tires when my toe was way off. It's very hard to mess the camber up enough on an escort to make it wear like that. Even with a 3"-4" drop it won't be that bad. Unless something is bent I would bet it's the toe setting.
 
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