FEOA Forums banner
101 - 120 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks for the info on changing the fuel pump and modification for "dies on corners". My 1997 Escort just started dying on corners. I have replaced the fuel pump which (the new model) seems to have the hose modification already (no pulsator thingy). However, I cannot see your pictures so I cannot be sure I am looking at the right thing. It still dies turning right (how can it be a design flaw if it just started doing this ... 184,o00 miles)?
Elsewhere I saw your explanation of how to jump out the fuel cutoff switch. I am suspecting this now because I have changed about 6 other components with no luck. Also, it is a turning problem so if this is faulty it might think that turning (right) is the same thing as flipping upside down, therefore cutting power to the fuel pump).
Anyway, you said to short/jump the black and black/pink wires. I have black/pink, blue, and green/red (slightly thinner than the other two). Which two should I jump/short so I can test if this switch is causing the problem (and if it is, I will replace the switch).
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks for the info on changing the fuel pump and modification for "dies on corners". My 1997 Escort just started dying on corners. I have replaced the fuel pump which (the new model) seems to have the hose modification already (no pulsator thingy). However, I cannot see your pictures so I cannot be sure I am looking at the right thing. It still dies turning right (how can it be a design flaw if it just started doing this ... 184,o00 miles)?
Elsewhere I saw your explanation of how to jump out the fuel cutoff switch. I am suspecting this now because I have changed about 6 other components with no luck. Also, it is a turning problem so if this is faulty it might think that turning (right) is the same thing as flipping upside down, therefore cutting power to the fuel pump).
Anyway, you said to short/jump the black and black/pink wires. I have black/pink, blue, and green/red (slightly thinner than the other two). Which two should I jump/short so I can test if this switch is causing the problem (and if it is, I will replace the switch).
Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
After replacing my fuel pump and strainer I started to have much worse stalling in corners. I suspected that it could be due to the new filter sock, which is different from the original design.

I disconnected the fuel line at the top of the filter and put a vinyl hose onto it, leading to a five gallon pail. Then I grounded the fuel pump relay at the diagnostic connector and turned on the ignition to cause the pump to run constantly, emptying the fuel tank into a couple of pails.

As soon as I started seeing bubbles and foam in the vinyl tube I turned off the ignition to stop the pumping. Then I removed the fuel pump and swapped the old filter sock back onto it and reinstalled. Repeating the pumping out process, I got another two US gallons or so of gasoline.

What appears to be happening is that the pump starts sucking air as soon as the topmost part of the sock is above the fuel level, as it is easier to suck air than suck liquid.

Here's an image of the faulty filter sock:
Wood Gas Metal Circle Auto part


Yes, it's dirty but the fuel flow was still high when I was pumping out.

Here's the extra fuel that came out after I reinstalled the old original type filter:

Cup Wood Ingredient Cuisine Drink


By the way, the filter socks clean up really easily by letting them dry in the sun and then cleaning them with soap and water, or even better, oven cleaner and water.
Of course let it dry again before reuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
You will be working with the fuel system of the vehicle. Since gasoline is explosive there is always the chance you can blow yourself up, or start a really nice fire if you don't follow common sense. This is the same commen sense they were supposed to teach you in grade school so let's hope you learned it well.

It's not my fault in any way if you blow yourself up, break stuff, or start a really nice fire.

Locate the fuel cut-off switch in the trunk of the vehicle, and flip the tab up so it is in the off position. Start the car and let it run until it dies. This should only take a few seconds.

Disconnect the battery


Remove your back seat


Undo the fuel cap to relieve fuel tank pressure


Remove the access cover and undo the fuel pump harness


Pull out the tabs and disconnect the fuel lines. Tie them back. Keep track of which one is which or you will have issues when you go to start the car again. Clean the area around the locking ring.


Using a hammer and a non-ferrous punch (aluminium-hardworrd-copper or anything tough and non-sparking), undo the locking ring turning counter clockwise. Remove the pump from the tank. Be careful to not allow any debris to fall into the tank. It will require some wigglage to get the pump out around the fuel level sending unit as well. Take your time and be patient, it does come out.

The entire sending unit.


To change the fuel pump is quite simple once you get the strainer off as it is in there quite hard to remove. After that just slide the pulsator assembly up on the tube, disconnect the wires and replace with a new pump.

The fuel pulsator mod, why the car dies on corners

If your car:

-Sputters with less than 1/4 tank of fuel and is fine anyother time
-You experience a huge loss of power or your car dies when taking on-ramps/exit ramps or sharp corners

...than this mod is probably for you.

You can see from this end pic how the grey seal isn't sealing too well. What happens is as the pump moves back and forth in the tank it distorts these seals causing fuel pressure to bleed down. Once it gets bad enough it will bleed enough pressure that you feel anything from a lack of power to a complete stall. You can see in the pic above how I originally had a zip tie wrapped around the fuel pump to restrain any excess movement. With the movement gone the car ran much better, but not as good as it was about to.


I went to my local parts store hoping to easily get a replacement. I managed to get a Carter part number, but the part is discontinued. Ford will only sell you the entire sending unit. Seeing as how I just shelled out some coin on a new fuel pump thinking it was the problem, I was not about to spend double that on a sending unit from Ford.

The solution, hose!!!!

The pulsator acts as a vibration damper, basicallly an acumulator for the fuel system to help reduce shock loads on the pump. Seeing as how the fuel system is already equipped with a pressure regulator which also helps reduce shock, it seemed kind of redundant and I could find no other reasons for it being there. I couldn't seen any harm in replacing it with a piece of hose, so I did.

You have to be careful what kind of hose you use. Notice the yellow tinge/coating on the hose. This is because it is wax impregnated fuel injection hose. The wax helps repel the gasoline and extend the rubber hoses life while in the tank. Regular rubber hose will degrade or go "skunky" after a few months when left submerged in fuel. This is 5/16" fuel injection hose rated at 65psi, more than enough for stock applications. If you're running higer fuel systems pressures than that, you're probably more than smart enough to get a higher pressure hose for your application.

A couple of clamps, and in she went. Micky mouse zip tie removed.


Installation is the reverse of removal. Once you get the sending unit in and hooked up, you may want to hook the harnesses, fuel lines, and battery back up. Reset the fuel cutout switch and take it for a drive without the access panel or rear seat in. This will give you a visual indication if the tank ring seal is leaking or not. If it's good and dry, with the car off disconnect the harness, re-install the cover and rear seat and your good to go. If it leaks, re-check the tank seal to ensure it is seated properly, it can be trying to put in. If everything appears fine, you may either need a new tank seal or new locking ring.

I have had this in my car in excess of a year and a half time with no problems. This includes exposure to the occaisional bottle of injector cleaner. Also, my car sat with the same tank of fuel (with stabilizer) for 4 full months, probably the worst thing you can do with fuel components is to let them sit for long periods of time with the same degrading fuel. Not a single problem to date, this car runs like it was new :wink:

Matt 8)

EDITED to add additional reference link to a discussion, and repair of same fault.
http://www.feoa.net/threads/97-escort-randomly-stalls.106121/
Matt, for some reason, I can't see any of the pics posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
I never saw an O-ring on any filter sock, even presumably original equipment ones.
Thinking about it, it would seem to be important to have one, or else the pump will start sucking air as soon as the fuel level drops below the top of the attaching metal ring, right?

I'll see if a standard size Viton O-ring will fit my filter, and next time I order from Rockauto I'll see about getting the "Brute Power" sock. I'm curious to see if the OEM type sock has a groove to fit the O-ring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
Wood Gas Auto part Coil Tool
Automotive tire Tire Hood Motor vehicle Wheel
Well my almost 30 year old junkyard fuel pump gave up the ghost so I swapped in one of these $5 ebay beauties:

View attachment 48486

View attachment 48488

I install the "rubber" seals in the pulsation dampener, but not the clips. A bit of O-ring lube (or any light grease, thick oil etc.) on the piping allows the rubber seal to slide up far enough so that the pump can be installed in the hanger.

Wood Gas Auto part Coil Tool


I should have posted this first, but I tie (or wire) up the fuel lines to keep some of the fuel from draining out.

Wood Gas Auto part Coil Tool


I should have posted this first, but I tie (or wire) up the fuel lines to keep some of the fuel from draining out.

You may ask if a $5 fuel pump is likely to work for very long. Well just in case, I bought two! I am keen to see how long this pump does work. It does the job fine now, maintaining sufficient fuel pressure and a smooth, non-pulsating pressure.
I'll keep the spare pump in the car with my small tool set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
My 91 GT also has this problem. The additional problem is that I won't be able to start it again until the car cools down (think 2 1/2 to 3 hours minimum). It will turn over freely but won't vroom vroom, so I just end up killing the battery trying to get it to start again. Anyone else have this problem? Anyone know how to fix it?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
39,523 Posts
My 91 GT also has this problem. The additional problem is that I won't be able to start it again until the car cools down (think 2 1/2 to 3 hours minimum). It will turn over freely but won't vroom vroom, so I just end up killing the battery trying to get it to start again. Anyone else have this problem? Anyone know how to fix it?
be best to create a separate post in the 2nd gen gt sub forum. this thread goes back to 2014.
 
101 - 120 of 120 Posts
Top