Suspension - How much cut equates to how much drop? | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Suspension How much cut equates to how much drop?

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by Squidboy, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. Squidboy

    Squidboy FEOA Member

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    I want to cut my stock springs, I'm sure someone here was done it before. Anyone know the formula for cutting these springs? 3rd gen wagon. Thanks!
  2. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    I got Megan Lowering Springs with your name on it.

    Generally every coil is about an 1 1/4"

    John
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  3. madmatt2024

    madmatt2024 FEOA Member

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    Just do the job right and get lowering springs, they are pretty cheap for these cars.
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  4. Squidboy

    Squidboy FEOA Member

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    I want to go lower than lowering springs will take me.
  5. madmatt2024

    madmatt2024 FEOA Member

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    Then get coilovers or coilover sleeves.
  6. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    How low do you want to go? I have a set of Ground Control coilovers on my wagon and this is the lowest I was able to get it without it scraping every little irregularity in the road.

    [​IMG]

    These were with 205/40/17 tires.

    John
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  7. Bas1c973sco

    Bas1c973sco FEOA Member

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    That ride height is gorgeous John!

    @Squidboy if you want to go lower than coil overs and springs, you might as well bag it. Cutting springs might be easier and seem “cool” or “diy” but, it’s super dangerous and not the way to go, because when you cut a coil off you’re changing the spring rate that it is not made for. New lowering springs are less than $200 for our cars, I would recommend starting there and then see how low you really want to go because once you change your rims and tires (if you decide to) that will also affect handling and ride height (some what). Keep us in the know!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  8. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    I wouldn't call cutting springs dangerus but it will change the spring rates.

    John
  9. madmatt2024

    madmatt2024 FEOA Member

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    I would call it dangerous if you cut them to the point that there isn't any preload and the springs can come out of the perches if the shock is fully extended.
  10. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    True which is why you shouldn't cut springs more than a coil or two max.

    John
  11. wasthatawagon

    wasthatawagon FEOA Member

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    Ground control coilovers, all the way down in the front, cranked up about 2 inches in the back, 215/35/18's
    Just get real lowering springs, it will ride way better.
    20190504_172735.jpg 20190416_202344.jpg
  12. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    What car did the bumper cover come off of?

    John
  13. Swift

    Swift FEOA Donator

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    Looks like 2nd gen gt
  14. wasthatawagon

    wasthatawagon FEOA Member

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    What Swift said, 2nd gen GT
  15. Roarrr

    Roarrr FEOA Member

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    WHY dangerous?? unless you chop so much that the springs might fall out the stiffer will help the handling but increase the roughness like stiffer aftermarket springs will also, I'm going to just collapse mine for about a 1.5" drop, if that doesn't work, I'll buy some replacement lowers.
  16. madmatt2024

    madmatt2024 FEOA Member

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    You are still going to have to remove the struts, remove the springs from the struts, cut them, then reassemble. If you don't get the desired result then you are going to have to do it all over again. Why not do lowering springs the first time and not have to mess with it again? Why is it some people always seem to have the time/money to do a job twice rather than to do it right the first time?
  17. novanutcase

    novanutcase FEOA Member

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    While I agree with you on not doing things twice, stancing a car takes time and patience. It's a lot like gapping a door. Lot's of trial and error. Sure you can get it close with lowering springs but if their is a particular look and ride height you're going for you're going to have to R & R the suspension many times to get it right. Coilovers make it easier as you don't have to remove the strut/spring setup but coilovers typically have a harsher ride than lowering springs so the ease you get in adjusting ride height has a tradeoff.

    If you really want to slam the car then coilovers is the way to go. Lowering springs will usually not drop a car more than a couple inches which looks better than the stock height but may not land at the ride height you want for the car.

    Usually when I cut springs to lower a car I don't tighten the bolts on the strut tower or the ones that attach the strut to the spindle. I just run the bolt through and spin the nut on for a few turns to keep the assembly together. This allows me to put the car on the ground and get an idea as to what the ride height is going to look like without having to go back in and fully disassemble the suspension if I have to make an adjustment.

    Removing the spring from the strut/shock is still going to be laborious but I found using a socket on a drill makes it easier to compress/decompress the spring if you have to remove it to cut it some more. If you do this please do it slowly. Compressing and decompressing springs is dangerous if the compressor lets go. Doing it quickly with a drill just invites more chances of that happening which is why I say do it slowly.

    As a general rule for me a coil typically equates to around an inch of drop but that also depends on how new the springs are. If they're right out of the box then they need to be seasoned for around five hundred miles so that they settle in on the final ride height. Once they're settled in then I would cut them. I had a friend cut a new set of springs and he didn't listen to me about seasoning them. When he first had them on the car the ride height was great but as time went on the springs started to settle in and the car rode too low and the tires rubbed the fender wells along with the floorpan getting dragged over every little bump in the road.

    As much as I like the Ground Control CO's, my girlfriend complains constantly that her chest hurts from the stiff suspension!:rolleyes: I'm thinking of hitting up Eibach since they're offices are fairly close to me to see if they have a progressive beehive style spring that will allow the car to ride at the ride height I would like with a little less harshness in regards to ride quality.

    John

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