Exhaust manifold heat shield | Page 2 | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Exhaust manifold heat shield

Discussion in '2nd Gen 1991-1996 1.9L SOHC' started by 1owner95, Nov 24, 2019.

  1. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    Lol...noted!
  2. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I would agree with the above, but if you really want to get it off, and make it easier for the next time, then keep soaking the nut/threads with penetrating oil: As in "dripping wet", And work the nut back and forth (keeping it dripping wet) till it unscrews okay. Once you get that tubing nut off, a good slathering with any antisieze compound should be spread on the threads when it goes back together; and dont try to overtighten it. The specs for the seven or so exhaust manifold nuts is 16-19 ft-lbs. It wont matter if its the nuts is still frozen onto the stud, the torque would be the same. Be sure to put a tiny amount of antiseize compound onto the threads of the stud as you put it in.
    That you got the three tiny bolts holding the heat shield off is super. I have had to melt them with my torch on a couple of my Escorts. The tiny studs-with-nuts should also get coasted with antiseize compound. Their torque spec is 3-5 ft-lbs.
  3. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    Well the deed is complete, the 1owner95 is once again purring like a kitten! Thanks to all that shared their knowledge with a proud knuckle busting Escort owner like me.

    I thought I'd share one thing that I tried, and was successful. After the great input on the forum, I decided to not risk doing more damage that removing the EGR line might cause. So once I had the 3 bolts out that were holding the heat shield in place, I was able to tip the shield towards the front of the car a bit more, as well as lift in slightly with my left hand. I was then able to clip the shield at the bottom with metal shears with my right hand. That allowed me to fold a piece of the shield back in order to pull it up from around those two pesky EGR line bolts. (I attached a pic that makes it easier to understand) Once the shield was out of the car, I found ALL of the manifold bolts had indeed backed out, some further than others. I re-torqued them to proper specs that you provided, and reassembled the entire thing. Started it up and the pesky "throaty" noise had vanished!
    The entire event took less than an hour to complete, and now when you look under the hood, there is no evidence of what transpired due to the cut on the shield being hidden by the EGR bolts.
    Lastly, I have no doubt that using the PB Blaster you recommended helped immensely. I actually used an entire can of it over the course of 4 days (cold, drive, hot, repeat) to make sure I had given myself a chance to be successful. I can't wait to share the information with the original mechanic that helped me diagnose, but he didn't want to touch it. (I don't blame him a bit) As it was pointed out, his business has to make money and they simply don't have the time to spend on it like did doing the prep work and expect a customer to pay for that time.

    Thank you all once again, and it would appear that I won't have to tow it to Seabeck after all! ;-)
    IMG_5628.jpg IMG_5968.JPG IMG_8655.JPG
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  4. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    Great news, and thanks for the feedback. Now we all know more.
    I like the notch in the heat shield. I have an extra heat shield somewhere, with a notch like that. I hadnt thought about it, but doubtless it was made for the same reason as yours.

    Folks tell me I would have made a great mechanic; but I explain that doing it as a hobby is a luxury. Doing it for a living involves that pressure to get the job done and the car out of the shop - so the next car can be brought in. Its a pretty competitive business, and if the repair shop in the next block is doing short-cuts (being less thorough, using 2nd hand parts but charging for new, etc.), you have to try to compete with them - or go broke.
    Since I only work on cars for my family and never charge for it, I can take as long as I want, and work on what I want. Doing it my way, its fun.
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  5. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    You would have made a great mechanic for sure. My guess of your background shows a very strong inclination to teach, so I'm thinking college professor or equivalent?

    One last question Professor Denisond3...while deep cleaning my interior I decided to remove the driver's seat. I had to disconnect an electrical harness in order to complete the removal. I'm wondering what that controls. Automatic seatbelts perhaps?
  6. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I think it controls the seat belt warning chime and light; turning them off when you buckle-up. The control module for the automatic seat belts is under the driver's seat. It gets input from the driver's door latch switch, the ignition being on, and of course the limits switches for the extruded aluminum track the auto seat belt slider runs in. That switch you unplugged only has to do with the little seatbelt symbol on the cluster, and the beeping if you have turned on the ignition, but not put the seat belts (shoulder and waist) on.

    Thanks for the compliment. No teaching though. Most of my time was spent managing contracts for shipboard tactical processing systems. Civilians buy the ships that the sailors take into hostile waters.
    When I was young I got a lot of help with my auto hobby from older hobbyists and mechanics. Now I am old; they are all dead. So its kind of up to me to help younger guys. like yourself!
  7. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    That was indeed the case. Since the automatic feature failed on the driver’s side (pax still functions) I’ve been staring at that seat belt light, but too lazy to address it. I had hopes of finding one that operates to replace it, but no luck. I finally had my mechanic make it stay stationary 3 years ago. Manual belt like the manual transmission! The light is now extinguished as well. Thank you Professor!

    p.s. As far as me being young, 65 is the new 40 I’m told.
  8. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    The 'automatic' shoulder belt stays stationary on three of my five Escorts now, just due to the mechanism wearing and jamming up. So I just clip it on after I get in, like I do with the lap belt.

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