Exhaust manifold heat shield | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Exhaust manifold heat shield

Discussion in '2nd Gen 1991-1996 1.9L SOHC' started by 1owner95, Nov 24, 2019.

  1. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    If anyone is familiar with removing the heat shield to the exhaust manifold on a 1.9 liter engine on a ‘95 Escort, please chime in.
    I have shot the 3 screws with PB Blaster several times, and they are able to turn freely. My main issue is removing the unknown rigid pipe that runs from the front of the exhaust manifold to the back near the intake manifold. It is also needed to be done in order to free the shield. The rear-most fastener of it poses the biggest problem because the area is so tight. A crows foot might work, but it would need to be 28mm. Hard to find! The 2 fasteners in the front of it are of different sizes, 1” & 28mm.
    Once the shield is off, I’m hoping to check all of the bolts, as I can actually see one that has backed out, and there’s probably more. I’ll re-torque to
    spec and enjoy driving it again!
    Thanks in advance for advice, and please identify the rigid pipe I spoke of earlier. I’m not sure of its purpose.
  2. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to the forums!
    That pipe is the EGR air tube, which takes exhaust gases back to the EGR valve mounted on the intake manifold. The fitting on the front end of it is a tubing nut, and is commonly hard to unscrew. It is the same size as the nut on the back end of the EGR air pipe where it fits into the bottom of the EGR valve. The other hex shape that is right next to the exhaust manifold is a standard pipe thread, that would take several turns to unscrew from the manifold; therefore you are pretty well required to be able to get the tubing nut unscrewed first.
    A couple of techniques to loosen up the tubing nut on the front end: Use a hammer and a flat faced steel drift to smack the nut 'sideways'. I.E. striking the flat hex surfaces perpendicularly. This will help to shock the rust, and get the penetrating oil to go into the threads inside that tubing nut. Getting a large adjustable wrench and making sure it is adjusted to be a tight fit onto the hex of the tubing nut -might- let you turn it, or might just start to smush over the flat hex sides.
    At this point an acetylene torch could be used to heat the hex sides of the tubing nut. This will expand the nut slightly, as well as softening the rusty grip of the threads inside. I dont know if a MAPP torch would work, as the oxy-acetylene is a lot hotter than the MAPP (or propane). I would remove the ignition wires to avoid damaging them with the flame from the torch, and probably to use a piece of scrap sheet steel to keep the heat of the flame away from the plastic radiator fan shroud/blades & the oxygen sensor. It might even be worthwhile to just remove the radiator fan and shroud; which involves taking out three small bolts (10mm socket) and unplugging the connector to the fan motor.**
    Another method that I have had to use, is using a cold-chisel, and to first make a tiny notch across one of the flat hex sides of the tubing nut, then angling the cold-chisel in such a way that when you hit it with a hammer, you are forcing the tubing nut to unscrew. Try to take care of the fitting that screws into the exhaust manifold; I have not found a source of those. The threads going into the exhaust manifold are just a normal 'pipe thread' type; but the threads on the other end are not pipe threads, they are a 'tubing thread'.

    You dont need to undo the nut where the EGR air pipe goes into the EGR valve, since its going to be easier to take out the two bolts holding the EGR valve into the intake manifold.
    There are two tiny bolts that hold the EGR air tube to the back side of the bracket holding the coil pack to the side of the head. I think they take a 6mm or 6.5mm socket.

    Once you get it apart, I like to clean up the threads by using comet cleanser and a hand held sprayer (with water in it) to run the tubing nut back and forth and clean out the rusty muck. I slather anti-seize compound liberally onto the threads before I put it back together, and twist the nut back and forth plenty of times, to make sure it is seating fully to prevent leaking (and further accumulation of rusty muck). I dont try to make it super tight though.

    I would not try to turn the hex that is right next to the exhaust manifold. That one is the pipe thread, and would take several turns to come out of the manifold.

    ** You can take out the four small bolts/nuts that hold the two top radiator clamps. Then the radiator can be pivoted an inch or so forward, making it easier to get the fan shroud pulled up and out.
    Good Luck
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  3. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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  4. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    denisond3, thank you very much for your meticulous response! This will indeed help me with the issue, should I decide to do the work. Since I don't have access to an acetylene torch, I may ask around to see if a good mechanic in my area has performed the work before. I have taken really good care of the car since new, so I'm not likely to get in over my head. I do like to tinker though, and being retired has its benefits of letting the mind mull over things until they become a bit more clear before proceeding. THANKS AGAIN!
    (I accidentally posted the request to the "Introductions" page. :-( I love the forum but do find it a tad cumbersome to navigate. Perhaps more use will help me)
  5. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    moved thread to second gen subforum. introduction sub forum is for introductions only.
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  6. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    it is 50/50 if any of the exhaust hardware will come off.. ford never used high quality materials in the exhaust hardware.
  7. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    Thank you for moving my inquiry to the proper place. Also, thanks for the input regarding quality of materials, or lack thereof!
  8. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    the heat shield is not 'required' but it does help to keep underhood temps down a bit. mostly to protect the radiator and fan assy. if i had a dollar for every crap ford exhaust bolt ive had to fix. i would be retired by now.
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  9. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    This is shaping up to be a project for someone that seriously likes to tinker/repair. It's frustrating because I've owned the car since new, always done the right thing to keep it in great running order. People that ride in it can't believe its age or mileage. That being said, I am also working up the courage to give it a shot. If I'm unsuccessful, I will tow it to Seabeck and leave it parked at your home. Merry Christmas. :)
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  10. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I am also retired. My Escorts provide me with exercise, as well as reliable economical transportation; & the satisfaction I get from keeping them running.
    It wont matter so much if you find a mechanic that has done similar work before, the hard part will be finding one who is willing to use his torch to get the tubing nut loosened up. After that you wont need him/her, and can drive it home to do the rest of the work; assuming the rest of the work doesnt involve taking the catalytic converter off. That may also require the gentle attention from the oxy-acetylene torch.
    I am about 2500 miles south and east of Seabeck, & only work on my own cars. Only 8 miles from Mexico though, and 50 miles from the Gulf of Mexico.
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2019
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  11. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    I had it up on the hoist last week and did a comprehensive inspection right beside the mechanic. Catalytic converter was noted as in excellent shape (by the eyes) as well as all other parts that normally show wear. Once we diagnosed where the noise I had described to him was coming from, (we hadn't seen the backed-off bolt at that time) that is when I was told of his reluctance to go hard charging into the melee as he was trying to make sure I knew it could get pretty expensive very quick if bolts broke off, or parts weren't readily available. I'm sure he was assuming I was going to sell the car soon, and better to just divulge the issue to a buyer and let them decide what their skill level was in order to tackle it.
    On another note...would you happen to know what trim tool I need to remove the plastic panel covering the bottom of the hatchback? There is an annoying rattle in there I would like to diagnose. The trim buttons (see pic) are about 5/8"
    IMG_8297.JPG IMG_5527.JPG
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2019
  12. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I use a tiny screwdriver, to pry out the center of those 'panel fasteners'. Once the center pin is pulled out, the larger part will usually slide out pretty easily.

    I havent had the interior panel of my hatchback removed yet. But there might be some more fasteners, that are on the inside surface of the panel. You need to use some flat tool (like a kitchen knife) to slide around the rim between the plastic panel, and the metal behind it. If there are extra fasteneing points, they will stop the blade of the knife. Then you can pry the panel up at that point, by twisting the knife blade sideways. Dont just pry anywhere, since if you pull the panel sideways it may break off one or more of the hidden fasteners.

    Its true things can get expensive fast, if you are using a mechanic. He cant afford to be too gentle, as he has to make a profit with whatever tasks he gets involved in.

    If you tell us what you are planning to do, we can probably tell you what parts there are that are unavailable. My personal experience is that all of the fasteners holding the exhaust manifold onto the head will come up with much grief. Expect the nuts to come still attached to the studs. I like to free up the nuts from the studs before putting things back together, but you can also just put the studs back in they way they came out.
    There is one of the studs on the exhaust manifold that is on the extreme left. It cant be reached with any wrench I ever found. It means taking the alternator off the engine accessory bracket to really get to it. With cars where you are the n-nth owner, that left handmost stud is often missing, nut and stud and all. It didnt seem to make a difference, the manifold was not leaking.
  13. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    Thanks again for of your great input! My neighbor that just finished his 8 year project of an entire rebuild of his '70 Roadrunner has offered to help in my quest to get my ONE OWNER '95 back in top shape. Your expertise was not lost on him. He was impressed.
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  14. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    lol sweet.
  15. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    Im still wondering what it is you are aiming at, what with taking the EGR air pipe off the exhaust manifold. That tells me you will be taking the exhaust manifold off, and maybe taking the head off?
    With each of the Escorts I rebuilt, (usually for a worn out transmission or worn out clutch or rusty shifing rods), I took off exhaust manifold (which involves disconnecting the catalytic converter), and took off the intake manifold. With those two weighty items off the car, the engine and transmission could hoisted straight up (I have an cantilever hoise) still bolted together. Then I could set them onto my workbench (which is a sheet of 3/4" plywood 3' by 8', sitting on sturdy (homemade) sawhorses. This is in my backyard, and would get covered with a tarp overnight. Unbolting the trans from the engine is lots easier when the engine and trans are at waist level on the workbench. Same thing for bolting them back together. The only slow hard part is getting gthe CV axles out of the transmission. When and If you get to that point, we have lots of helpful advice on how to get it done without tears and anxiety.
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  16. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    you should be able to get the engine out with the intake and exhaust still attached..
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  17. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    Sorry, it’s been a few days since online!

    As far as what I’m doing taking the EGR air pipe off, I was assuming in order to tighten up the exhaust manifold bolts that have backed out (causing a “throaty” sound coming from under the exhaust manifold heat shield) I would need to remove the heat shield completely. If that is not the case, please advise. Today was the day to try to remove the shield, and I’m happy to report all three of the fasteners were removed without issue. The tubing nut on the EGR was another matter. I was able to turn it about a 1/4 turn, then it got much harder to move. That is the reason I came back to this forum. I wanted to know what damage I could do by forcing it further? Also, if I am then successful at totally removing the heat shield, what is the torque spec for the manifold bolts? I attached a couple pics to illustrate the items mentioned. Thanks in advance for all the input!!
  18. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    both threads are most likely full of rust. this is totally normal for a ford. problem is that if you attempt to completely remove the tube it will horribly gall the threads to the point where they are un-usable. be careful with this process.
  19. 1owner95

    1owner95 FEOA Member

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    49D274E9-4EC7-4D6C-847F-C7A4D8AB3CB6.jpeg B7B16FE8-C51F-4FB6-94CF-ED9F38F043D2.jpeg
    Thank you very much!! That is exactly the reason I didn’t just force it further, and turned to someone with experience and expertise to give me input. I didn’t want to go down a road and regret it.
    Since I was able to get the heat shield off, I was able to see only one manifold bolt that had backed out, and that is more than likely the one that was causing the noise described in my earlier post. I believe I have enough room to tighten it. Then I’ll reassemble and check for the noise. I’d really like to know the torque value required however. Any input for that would be greatly appreciated.
  20. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    nice job man. i learned a lot from 'old me'.. see old me would have started tearing parts off reguardless of function.. new me is a bit more cautious.

    just keep in mind that, i am pretty sure ford goes to the scrap yards,, finds the rustiest metals in the bins, and re forms it into their exhaust hardware.. they are made of rust from the factory..

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