Engine - Egr removal | Page 2 | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)
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Engine Egr removal

Discussion in 'Tech & Repair' started by brackaj33, Aug 23, 2019.

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Will taking the egr out because of and engine swap effect the older computer or emissions test?

  1. Yes it will

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  2. Yes and you need to swap the fuel rail and intake to the old car

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  1. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    Well I didn't want to hear that the heater core is a major pain also. That sucks. In my 73 chevy K20, you drop the glove box and everything is right there. Oh, not my issue at the moment.

    Again, thanks for the info. The clutch must be in correctly and I had fluid in there until I pulled the axels out and got the trans off the engine. The for is connected to the slave cylinder right? Though I took off the trans from the engine, I didn't take it apart. Just wiped it down to clean it up a bit. I noticed more play where the slave connects on the bell housing so something is ip there. If the fork got moved around somehow, would that cause the the stick not to reach any gears? I was looking at the linkage thinking I bent something in the process but things look normal.

    I'm getting the shop lights out and going back under again tonight. Wish it would stop raining.

    Thanks.
  2. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    A spring inside the clutch slave cylinder gently pushes the piston of the slave cylinder outward, so it is n contact with the clutch release fork. This scheme eliminates any slop or lost motion as you push on the clutch pedal.
    If you have someone depress the clutch pedal, you should see the slave cylinder push the end of the release fork maybe 1/4" to 1/2". The resting position of the release fork depends on how much wear the clutch has on it; and how much the dished release spring in the pressure plate is help in position.
  3. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    Played with the trans last night everything seems fine. Got the trans back on and the fork seems to be jammed again. Is my bearing somehow jamming the fork and preventing it from moving. It almost seems like it is stuck in a gear even though the stick won't go into a gear. Bearing moves freely and fork moves when the trans is not connected.
    I'm stumped again.
  4. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I dont know which fork you are talking about. Is this the clutch release fork, which sticks out the front side of the trans and gets pushed sideways by the slave cylinder.
    Or.... Are you saying you can move the short little shifting shaft that sticks out the bottom rear of the transmission when it is not connected to the shift control rod? There is only about an inch to that shaft sticking out. The shift control rod is about 3 ft long and runs under the hump, back to the bottom of the shift lever. With one of mine that shift lever and the joints in the shift control rod were rusted up and the socket the shifter moves in had come un-connected to the shift stabilizer (which bolts to the floor hump below the shifter). I had to make up a replacement support (from permatex and sheet metal) for the support for the shifter socket. It was a lot of manual labor - but Im a retired guy, so its just leisure time to me.
    One of the unfortunate things about the 2nd gen 5-speed is that it has a magnet hidden inside its bottom. The purpose is to pick up all the grindings from the revers-idler-gear, as well as any other shavings that get worn off one the synchro parts on the mainshaft or secondary shaft. But they didnt put the drain plug right under that magnet. I had the case halves apart, and scooped out a fair amount of the ground up metal fragments. Otherwise they would still be in there. In my case they werent causing any problem -yet. So I dont know what happens when they do accumulate. Also if the trans is forced when it doesnt want to go into a gear, that can bend a shifting fork. And I think the only way to correct it, is to dismantle and either straighten the bent fork, or source a new unbent one.
    Should you want to dismantle the transmission, complete instructions are given in the Ford
  5. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    The fork that the slave is attached to won't move, like it is binding up when the Tran is installed. I have replaced the slave before and bleed the hell out of it on Saturday so it is not the fluid issue there. I have no gotten into any other forks and the shift shaft and support rod seem fine but won't move the gears.
  6. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I dont know what to say. I guess its possible you have the clutch disc in backwards, or the throwout bearing is hanging up on something. The release fork should move toward the driver's side of its opening with a sideways push, but would take a few hundred pounds to do it.
  7. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    OK, I just thought of something. Back in January I broke a speedo gear off in the transmission. I was told they are made of plastic for that reason and that the trans should chew it up and when I drain the fluid, I would find chunks. Maybe a piece could still be in the case jammed on a linkage somewhere? I don't know. Most of the timed I am this stuck it ends up being something stupid I am just missing. I need fresh eyes on it all.

    Thanks again for the help.
  8. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree the gear on the bottom of the VSS could fall off - and be chewed up by the gears in the differential. I dont know if you would ever see them when draining out the fluid though. Its something I have never yet needed to do.
  9. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    Well, somehow, I have a shifter again. The clutch pedal needs serious bleeding, but I have all my gears back. Don't know exactly what I did when I removed the transmission, but something good happened. Now I bleed her and test drive her. Thanks for all the help everyone on this thread has given me. I appreciate it a ton. Fact is I just don't know any car people anymore. Seems like no one cares about cars these days unless it is some pretentious luxury SUV. And that only last until the next one comes out. Anyways,.... Thank you all.

    Andy B
  10. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    I've found with my family car fleet that if you can get a hydraulic clutch to work at all, and the car is driven regularly, it will gradually purge the air out of the system by itself with use.

    It's not like brakes where it is important for safety to get out all the air in the system, it just has to work well enough to shift without grinding the gears.
  11. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for letting us know of success AndyB. I have a procedure for bleeding the clutch on my 5-speed Escorts. It involves squeezing the rubber tube running from the side of the master cylinder reservoir back to the top of the clutch master cylinder, using ordinary pliers, until I dont see bubbles showing up in the m.c. reservoir. This takes some time, it wont happen in five minutes. More like 25 or 30. Then I open the bleeder screw 1/4 of a turn, and put my clear vinvl tube over the end of the bleeder, bringing the vinyl tube up to where I can see it from inside the car. (A long broomstick and duct tape does the job.) Then I begin to pump the clutch pedal, watching for bubbles rising in the clear vinyl tube. Slowly the clutch pedal begins to acquire a fedback resistance, and finally the bubbles no longer show up in the vinyl tube. Then I can clamp the bleeder screw shut. I have to keep refilling the m.c. reservoir as I do this.

    I see folks travelling along at 70+, when I would just as soon drive at 60 or 55 - though staying out of the way of 18 wheelers makes that not feasible. A few times I have gotten to drive newer cars belonging to friends. I have to spend time figuring out how to work the special features, even though I dont care for them. Maybe if I had a late model Honda or Volvo or Toyota I would want to drive father - just to get the drive over with sooner.

    And I wonder how many of the folks in cars they are still making payments on have any clue what to do when the driveline has a problem?
  12. brackaj33

    brackaj33 FEOA Member

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    I like not having payments and high insurance. And I am comfortable in my 92/now96 engine and my old 73 pickup. They do enough for me. Who needs heated seats, air bags and AC? Not me. I don't think I could ever drive a Toyota and not hate myself in the morning. So, so ugly and cookie cutter. I'm sure they are great for some people, but not me. Escorts were never my favorite and I wouldn't have chosen one. This one chose me and I owe the little bugger another 100,000 miles. I hope.

    Again, thanks to you and everyone on my little thread for all the help. It's a great community on FEOA and grateful for the knowledge and experience that everyone shares.

    AndyB
    denisond3 likes this.

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