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Seems you still need to continue the diagnosis of what really failed. Take good care of that power steering plastic tank. I had one that got cracked and could only find a replacement one on ebay, from a dismantler junkyard. I would advise starting to pull it apart, maybe doing a compression check - just to have a baseline. Based on your mileage I would figure on replacing the timing belt and tensioner, along with all the coolant hoses, maybe the water pump, and for sure the power steering pump and the high pressure hose attached at the output of the p.s. pump, I have rebuilt several 2nd gen escorts, and like to replace the original pulleys for the serpentine belt tensioner and idler, and check that the pulley still turns freely on the a.c. compressor. There is a bearing inside that pulley that cant be lubricated, and its kind of hard to replace, even after removing the compressor and the pulley; pretty easy to distort the face of the pulley when pressing the bearing out.
You should have a look at the condition of the rubber hoses and the metal lines that connect the transmission oil cooler to the radiator. I have had to replace the rubber hoses, and on one of my escorts I had to replace a section of the metal line that had rusted through.
It still pretty easy (cheap) to get the Ford Escort Tracer service manual from ebay, and the companion manual, the Electrical and Vacuum Troubleshooting Manual (EVTM). The EVTM has all the wiring diagrams in it, but get the one matching your year, since the EVTM does change each year.

We get between 34 - 37 mpg on the open road on our escorts with the automatic. I liked my first escort well enough that I bought one with the 5-speed transmission; though I had to replace the engine head and two pistons. On that one we get 39 mpg on interstates.
If you are going to have the engine out, I would replace the five freeze plugs on the block, and replace the radiator fan motor. The motor with its shroud are fairly cheap now.
It not uncommon for the plastic side tanks on the radiators to crack and leak - and the radiators are still well under $100 for a new one.
 

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Two of my escorts had dropped a valve seat insert - on the previous owners. Neither owner wanted to do the repair themselves nor pay to have it done. Both of those made a loud noise when you started them (very loud and a reluctant start), but there was also at least one of our members who had the same failure - and didnt hear any noise. ?? So I think 'it depends'.
Doing a compression check would clear that up fast - there would be normal compression in 3 cylinders and zero in the 4th one. If you dont get any compression in any cylinder, that would indicate a slipped or snapped timing belt Since these are non-interference engines (in spite of what the countermen in a lot of auto parts places say), such a fix doesn't involve any damage to the head......other than putting on a rebuilt head to have inlet valve seat inserts that have been replaced.
I have used Barr stop leak - but only put in a tiny amount (teaspoon full) for a tiny leak, Then after getting home (zip code 22312) from Flagstaff AZ I replaced the radiator.

One or two of our members have had an engine that failed - with a fractured piston, and that punched a hole in the cylinder wall. I think that is what would happen if an owner would only replace a engine head that dropped a valve seat insert, but didnt take the pistons out to check whether they had gotten 'peppered' by the broken chunks of valve seat. The car would run okay for a few hundred or a few thousand miles, but eventually the distorted piston would overheat and fracture; causing further communicative damage - such as putting a hole in the block. And for me, buying any escort that had a replacement head, would cause me to dismantle the engine to check on the pistons inside it. I do this by taking out the engine and transmission still bolted together, since that is the only way its possible to get the driveline out of the car by hoisting it all up.
 
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