Brake Shoe Size | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

Brake Shoe Size

Discussion in '2nd Gen 1991-1996 1.9L SOHC' started by Olga, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. Olga

    Olga FEOA Member

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    Hi there!

    I have brake fluid leaking out my rear wheel cylinder and want to install new brake shoes (and new brake drums) in the process. Rockauto offers two different sizes for the second gen Ford Escort brake shoes. Apparently some 2nd gen Escorts have 7.88" rear drum brakes and some have larger 9" brakes.

    Mine is a 1993 LX wagon. How would I know what size brakes I have?

    Thanks!
    Olga
  2. Olga

    Olga FEOA Member

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    There is also different rear drums for "front caliper cast" #22-14 or #22-13

    What the hell does that mean?!?
  3. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    The different drums for the different front calipers probably refer to the GT car.

    Unfortunately I'm not at home, so can't measure my spare shoes, perhaps others can chime in.

    I did find on Rockauto this bit under brake drum:

    BECK/ARNLEY Rear; Base Model; LX Model; Drum OD MM: 229.1; Drum ID MM: 200

    200mm is around 8", so it looks that's what you would have. But best wait for confirmation.
  4. Olga

    Olga FEOA Member

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    Thanks a bunch: I'm sure you're right.

    I just removed my tire and the drum has the information cast onto it. It says MAX DIA 201.5mm. I ordered the Centric Drum and Shoe Kit. It specifies the inner dimensions as that same maximum, so I guess the 1993 LX wagon should need the 7.88" rear drum brakes!
  5. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    Let's hope so! I've got a couple of wagons as well and have brake shoes in stock for them, but I haven't changed them yet as they last way longer than the front brake pads on my cars.

    I buy consumable parts for my cars when they are cheap from Rockauto. Things like hoses, belts, brake pads, etc.
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  6. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    It gets confusing when talking about parts with the same function, but maybe different 'fits'. For the LX 2nd gen Escorts, there were (at east) two size of brake drums and shoes. The change took place about the same time as they went to larger front rotors, and hence needed the 14" wheels. But I dont know if they made the change at the time of the 'model year change', i.e. from 93 to 94, or at the time of the production year change, which might not have been done at the same time in the two places where Escorts were being built; Wayne Michigan, and Hermosillo in Sonora, Mexico. For that matter, when a manufacturer gets low on inventory they might source parts from a different supplier. I dont even know if the rear subframes/brake parts were built in the same places as the cars! It would be nice to think Ford changed the front brake size at the same VIN serial number as they changed the rear brake dimensions; but who knows!
    Going to the listings at rockauto(dot)com, a 200cm drum would be 7.874 inside diameter, and would take that diameter of brake shoe - which would be 1-3/8" in width.

    A year or so later the Escort drums were 9 inches inside diameter, and the shoes would match that - but got thinner, to 1-3/16". !?

    22-13 and 22-14
    The casting number on the calipers refers to the rotor diameter they are to work with. Up through 1993 (early anyway) they would be 22-13, and have had the 9.25" diameter rotors. (Marginal stopping power). The later ones (on cars having 14" wheels) would have had a 22-14 cast into the caliper, and use the 10.25 diameter rotors. (Better brake power.)

    You cant just get the larger rotors to get the better brakes unfortunately. The steering knuckles had a different mount for the larger calipers; the pads were different (but close enough that countermen will give you the slightly smaller pads by mistake), and of course the 13" wheels will no longer fit on the front.
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  7. marclar

    marclar Moderator Staff Member

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    some lx sport did come with 14in fronts.. just comes down to what size wheels the car had from the factory is what they mean by the 2 different casting numbers
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  8. Olga

    Olga FEOA Member

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    Wow, such variety!

    It does help, that it seems like the required size front and rear brakes for the specific car on hand is cast onto the front caliper as well as the rear drum. So one should probably always check what one's own brakes say before purchasing replacement parts...
  9. Olga

    Olga FEOA Member

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    I just wanted to get back to the community on the rear drum repair. I thought is was actually quite an easy process. If there is brake fluid leaking around one of your rear tires, and you want to work on the brakes yourself, get yourself a new wheel cylinder (or two - I just replaced the other side since I was already in there anyway), new brake shoes for both sides (don't reuse brake shoes after they have gotten brake fluid all over them and don't ever replace only one side) and new brake drums (or get the old ones resurfaced if that is easier/cheaper for you) and a brake hardware kit to install new springs and clips (springs should be replaced anytime one is working on the brakes, since they get bad with the heating and cooling cycles inside the brake drums). I recommend getting a brake tool to remove and install the springs. Makes the job a breeze and it's only 10 bucks and can be found at any autoparts store. Just make sure you are getting the right size brake drum and shoes for your car. It's cast on your brake drum, you find it on there after removing your tires. Then make sure to bleed the brakes really well after you're done, paying attention to the right order of the bleeding process (RR-LF; LR-RF) and don't forget to re-adjust the parking brake.
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  10. denisond3

    denisond3 Moderator Staff Member

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    Good recommendations.
    I have had trouble getting the drum to come off with some of my Escorts. My favorite method is to hit the face of the drum, near its rim. This helps to tilt the drum up a little bit; freeing it from its tight fit onto the hub. After a few smacks moving it back and forth, I can usually get it off just by tapping on the side of the drum - but in a direction to urge the drum to move out. I dont hit it too hard, since that might brinnel the ball bearing inside the hub.

    I made up a tool that lets me relax the self-adjusters, but unless you know what the mechanicals are like inside the drum, its not the most practical thing. I take out the flat-head screws (if they arent missing already), and setting one of the through holes at about the 10:30 clock position (on the driver's side, or the 2:30 position on the passenger side), can get my curved tool (a torch-tortured small screwdriver) and push the self adjuster to retract it.
    Another thing I seem to need to do about each 6 or 7 years, is to take the small springs and brake shoes off, and wiggle the handbrake actuator out from the brake backing plate. This takes some patience, since its pivot commonly has gotten frozen into position due to rust. Then with each actuator in my shop vise, I free up the pivot, clean the rust as much as I can, and spray the pivot (for the handbrake) with a liquid molybdenum spray. Then I re-assemble.
    I usually polish the inside circle of the drum, and the mating circle on the hub, to make removal easier the next time. You must not take too much metal off here, since that is how the drum is held 'centered' as you travel.

    With my 5-speed Escort, I pull up the handbrake each time I get out of it, so the handbrake actuator gets frequent movement. But with my Escorts having the automatic transmission, I might weeks without pulling up the handbrake, just putting the shift into park instead. So the actuator gets stiff in less time.

    P.S. Im frugal; so I generally only replace drums when they have enough rust on the outside, that I cant read what the specified wear limit is.
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  11. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    A thing to keep in mind is that brake fluid is soluble in water. When I get a brake drum off, I hose everything off, and clean the area with a soapy brush and the garden hose.
    I then let the parts dry in the sun or wipe them down with paper towel if I am impatient. It is much more pleasant to work with all clean parts.

    I place small amounts of white grease at the contact points where the shoes touch the backing plate, the adjuster mechanism etc. Just use small amounts and think about how to keep it off of the shoe surface.
    I also will clean and put a bit of oil or grease on the inside hole of the drum where it centers on the hub, and on the wheel stud threads and anywhere else it would seem to do some good lubricating and/or keeping rust at bay.
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