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Discussion Starter #1
blew wheel cylinder last week so today i went to replace it and then........


one bolt holding the wheel cylinder on broke (never in 37 years have i had that happen)

the line would not come free from the wheel cylinder causing the line to twist with the nut into a useless mess, oh joy!

then went to take the line off of the "tee" block and the threaded portion of the line fitting broke off in the block........ really starting to get pissed of now.

went to remove the "tee" block from the rubber line.......... wtf why me!!! rubber line is shot cracked and just looks bad enough tht i wouldn't trust it.

thank god for small favors it did come off easy.

then just because today really wasn't my day, i am missing the right fitting for my double flairing tool :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: so i will finish it tomarrow.

see i bet you thought you were having a bad day weren't ya, i betcha i won. :lol:
 

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Sounds about right. Wheel cylinders can be a big pain to replace on older cars and trucks. One thing leads to another and most of the time I end up replacing 50% of the brake lines on vehicle, but they probably needed replacement anyway.
 

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But when you get out of bed again, there will still be the rusty brakes to deal with. I have more than one car, more than one Escort in fact. So when its time to start on the brakes, I generally figure on taking whatever time it soaks up, and replacing enough to ensure Im in control of things again. Once time this approach took three weeks of my time. Luckily I have an oxy-acetylene torch, or it could have been longer. Am also retired.
I have a motorhome, where the brakes parts are kind of pricey - it being almost 40 years old. It is much worse than the Escort.
 

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I guess I've been lucky. I've never had any issues when changing any brake parts, but I'm not in an area where there's lots of salt used on the roads so that helps keep the rust/corrosion to a minimum.
 

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Better than tooling down the road and hitting the brakes behind a line of cars only to have your pedal go to the floor. It happened in my '65 GMC PU about 30 years ago. It seems like only yesterday. All I could do was yank it off the road, downshift, turn off the ignition and bump along until it stopped.

Turned out to be a pinhole in a front brake line. The master cylinders on these are not segmented. When one line goes bad the whole system is bad.
 
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