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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How hard is it to do brake lines on one of these cars run ruptured today..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hmmm i didnt really look into it i just saw fluid flying all over and heard air escaping....uhh well... i think its a hard line there real rusty but it is possible its a rubber... but the line it hink that broke goes down the whole ar and looks metal
 

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You can get a hard line off of one at the junkyard, if you don't feel like bending up a new one.
 

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Had my rear hard lines rot out after 16 Wisconsin winters. I personally would not replace lines with ones from a yard... just a bad idea. I went and bent my own, abandoned the old ones in place and secured the new lines to the old. Had to do a little creative bending from the differential valve down around the trans and exhaust but it went well and the Old Girl is still on the road. 179K now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
what would be a good place to get a flare nut wrench cuz i tried using a regular wrench and it just slides off from rust so any idea's... and also who makes pre-flared lines??? napa autozone? and how hard is to get these rusted pos off
 

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what would be a good place to get a flare nut wrench cuz i tried using a regular wrench and it just slides off from rust so any idea's... and also who makes pre-flared lines??? napa autozone? and how hard is to get these rusted pos off
Harbor Freight, autozone, napa, checker, etc etc. Any auto parts stoire will have thew wrench.

ANy of them will also sell pre-flared lines. Only issue is they only come in a few different lengths.

IF all else fails, use a vice-grip to get the lines off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well i decided to take the lines off BUT... my main mechanic told me no cuz he saw that it was gonna break more lines... so we just cut the bad part off and put new line on with compression fittings....now idc what u got to say about them because hes been in the business 35 years and no problems... so i trust him...hes also a good friend of mine well technically his whole family so...idk i think i made a good idea... either that or i gotta replace all the lines with fresh ones.. and by the way i bought a $20 wrench it stripped the bolts and then i used vicegrips which then almost broke the whole line and others...
 

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The way he told you to do it is completly ignorant. A flared/patched up line will never hold as strong/as long as just running new lines. Even if the line looks good, it's not (Obviously, as the car is 20 years old). Now in a year or 2 you'll end up cutting and flaring a new chunk onto a different section that goes bad.

Your best bet when doing lines, is to replace them all the way from the master cylinder to the caliper. IF yuo do it this way, you dont need a flare nut wrench. Just cut the line off at the fitting and use a 6-point socket to remove the fitting, then run your new lines.
 

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I replaced the rear lines on my 92 1.9l. I cut the lines about under the drivers seat - as they were unrusted from there forward, and put on new nuts and then put a double flare on each line. From there back I used lines from the auto parts place, bent using a cheap tubing bender (or my hands), and where I needed longer chunks than they had, I used a coupling to join lines. I also replaced the two rear brake hoses, and the short lines from the brake hoses on the axle, out to the wheel cylinders.
Aside from dealing with some red ants, the work wasnt difficult. It was time consuming though. I had the back of the car jacked up and set on some wooden supports (6 x 6 lumber pyramids). About the hardest part was getting the original clamps that supported the lines, to unbolt from the bottom of the car; rusty of course.
I also dropped the fuel tank, to replace the fuel pump (car had 200k miles on it) and to replace a rubber connection hose between the tank and the filler neck. It was split and leaking.
My single largest expense was the double flaring tool - but I knew I would be using it on a couple of my other old cars.
If you make your own flares, you need to be using a 'double flare' tool.
I dont know if compression fittings work okay in the long run - but I am pretty sure the federal laws dont allow them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well eventually i will replace them all... but im unemployed and i am relying on my hyundai to do all the driving which i dont like cuz its really slow.... so i figure this would be a okay temo fix for $20
 

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I have an 87 Hyundai Excel, which is also slow - but I got it for its miles-per-gallon. Its fine for around town, doubt that I would want to drive it across the country though.
 
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