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Hey guys. I have a 1988 gt 5 speed and everytime i accelerate quickly when i get to about 2500-3000 rpms in 2nd gear the brake light lights up on my dash. It goes away when i tap the brakes but i was wondering if anyone else has had this issue and how to resolve it. Ive replaced the front brake pads, rotors, and calipers. Could it be an issue with the drums in the rear? I havent started work on the rear yet but was hoping for some insight b4 i started tearing into it.
 

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Make sure the handbrake handle is fully retracted. I dont know anything about the 1st gen escorts, but I would wonder if the magnet inside the brake fluid reservoir is still free to slide up and down, not hanging up on a chunk of crud.

Its a god bot of work, but I have replaced the master cylinder and its reservoir on a couple of my 2d gen escorts - because they had passed 25 years of age, and even with new fluid in them, i could see dirty areas inside the reservoir. Along with the new reservoir, I bled all four wheels. i prefer to do this with all four wheels off the car and the car jacked up at all four corners. That way i can get toall four of 1 the bleed screws.

Bleeding the rear wheel cylinders is one of those jobs like cleaning out the gutters on the house. Its so nice when its done for another year!
 

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Thank you. Turned out my issue was my brake fluid was juuust low enough that when i hit the powerband the fluid shifted away from the sensor
Late to the party, but let me add this for anyone stumbling across this thread in posterity:

Brake fluid does not just "go away" in a healthy, sealed system.

Drum brakes generally include a self-adjusting mechanism that results in the wheel cylinder pistons remaining in the same general position, with no added brake fluid "consumption" as the shoes wear.

The same cannot be said for disk brakes.
As the pads wear, the pistons reside further and further out of the calipers.
This adds to the volume of brake fluid residing behind the pistons, and an attendant drop in the level of the master cylinder's reservoir.

If the brake fluid in your healthy, sealed system has dropped enough to flicker the idiot light, you might want to check the thickness of your front pads.
 

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Late to the party, but let me add this for anyone stumbling across this thread in posterity:

Brake fluid does not just "go away" in a healthy, sealed system.

Drum brakes generally include a self-adjusting mechanism that results in the wheel cylinder pistons remaining in the same general position, with no added brake fluid "consumption" as the shoes wear.

The same cannot be said for disk brakes.
As the pads wear, the pistons reside further and further out of the calipers.
This adds to the volume of brake fluid residing behind the pistons, and an attendant drop in the level of the master cylinder's reservoir.

If the brake fluid in your healthy, sealed system has dropped enough to flicker the idiot light, you might want to check the thickness of your front pads.
Good point. Delffy time to check everything,
 
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