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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,

I tried to replace my front brake pads today but it seemed to just go all wrong. I got the old pads removed and compressed the brake piston as much as possible to make space to fit the new ones but when I went to install the new pads, they just did not fit. There was lots of space on the piston side, between the rotor and the piston, but on the other side, the space between the rotor and brake shoe housing was way too small for the other pad.

I went to the store and all the pads are the same, symmetrical in height and about the same height as the ones that i have. Apparently all third gen escorts use the same brake pads so I am sure I was trying the right part.

What is going on here? Warped rotor? Crooked shoe mounting relative to rotor? This is really wierd, like there is not enough space on the side where there is no way to adjust the dimension by messing with the piston.

I just put the old pads back in the one wheel I tried, hope it will still work for something, LOL.
 

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did you take off the whole caliper or just the 2 bolts holding the front bracket on? if you did the latter the slide pins are prolly siezed and you cant get it back together
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi guys,

Thanks for the responses.

I removed the two bolts that hold the caliper in position about the rotor, then removed the caliper for the purposes of extracting the old pads, compressing the cylinder, and trying to test fit the new pads.

It was when I went to try to fit the caliper back that I found the pads didnt allow for proper clearance with the rotor.

The two bolts that I am talking about had little rubber boots around the holes into which they went. From some stuff that I have read since first posting this, I am starting to understand that this is actually no simple hole for a bolt, but actually a sort of bearing, and there's supposed to be some play in it for it, and maybe it is just siezed up?

Is that what you guys mean? Or are you thinking just the two pins that hold the pads in place?

I tried to gently beat on the booted areas where the bolts went thinking just that sort of thing hoping I might free them up but it seemed solid so I figured it was just one casting.

But, do I need to remove these boots and try to seperate out this so called bearing and lubricate all of that, and then I should be able to change slightly the position where the caliper sits such that there is clearance for both pads?

If that's just it, I might take another crack at this, otherwise I think I am just going to leave it up to the pros. I saw a friend do a disc brake job on a camry and it looked mindless but it is sure kicking my butt..

Thanks again.
 

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those rubber boots are just dust covers That is a sleeve inside the caliper that should slide back and forth go to the parts store and tell them you want new slide pins and some brake caliper grease (aka dielectric grease)

you will get new slide pins and new dust boots



do the best you can to get the old ones out without hurting the caliper any, I use a beveled edge punch that sits inside the hole, and it wont scar the caliper when your hammering it out
 

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celery952 said:
brake caliper grease (aka dielectric grease)
Fail! Brake caliper grease and dielectric are not the same.

CRC makes brake caliper grease that comes in a jar. Get that. The grease is a synthetic moly grease that will not wash off and can take the heat from breaking. It can be used on any metal to metal contact that needs grease. It won't mess up plastic either since it isn't petroleum based. I have used it to grease the pivot on my short throw shifter with great success along with the obvious( my brakes).
 

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FTW any hi temp synthetic grease is fine for brakes let alone anything on a car that needs grease, minus plugs+boots. Buying anything part specific is insane -

oh and , AHAHA, celery, wtf!, dielectric grease for brakes, what are you smokeing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK, solid. I will pick up the parts and give this one more shot .. Wish they woulda mentioned this in chiltons, LOL.
 

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word of advice - repair manuals were based on new.. they had a NEW car to dissassemble when it was written, 12 years later - we have rust to deal with.. thats not in the manual, anywhere. All I can say is enjoy the car, but deal with the age. My suggestion is to get a rust inhibitor spray and jack up the car and spray the underbody if you want it to last.

I love my 97 - and Im doing my best to see it alive well past my demise.(Im only 36)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh, yeah, I understand that rust and material deformation over time and so on can be an issue in an old car vs a new one, but OTOH the chiltons folks should know that they're not writing for a new car.. people just get it serviced under warranty, but it is mostly on the older cars where it is going to be DIY. I like my scort and chiltons is generally useful and I am not dissing either one, its just amazing how between chiltons and the ton of tutorials on the web, nobody ever mentions it outright and it is usually only buried 60 comments deep from someone who actually knows what is going on that there is potentially more to it. And this is very much potentially a critical step. You'd think more folks would have the problem; but it is like the floating caliper is in perfect condition for everyone else out there but me, LOL. I'm glad I had you guys to school me out or else I would have just given up, assumed there was something wierd about my car, and bent over for midas or whoever.
 
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