FEOA Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That completely owns the McPherson strut design. It uses electromagnetic motors and complex computer algorithms to look ahead on the road and react to the bumps in the best way possible, almost completely eliminating body roll in turns as well as the feeling of bumps in the road.

http://www.bose.com/learning/project_so ... llenge.jsp

Oh, I put this in General Discussion because it transcends the regular discourse in the suspension forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,892 Posts
that looks pretty cool! where can I find that stuff, and how much does it cost???
 

·
BYO Plastic cutlery
Joined
·
9,869 Posts
there is such a thing as active suspension, and it's pretty old. Lotus was a pioneer in it. It used hydraulic rams in place of the springs and dampers. I had sensors all over the place sensing the yaw angles and the this and the that and the other thing. Then it would know whether to lift a wheel for a bump or lower a wheel for a pothole or set the car's stance for a turn and solidify it. It could even tell it to lean into a corner. It added a few meric tons of mass and cost several offspring. F1 cars had it for a while in the early 90s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,709 Posts
The reason why Bose, a seemingly unlikely candidate for suspension (being that their expertise is in the realm of acoustics), is doing so is because the physical laws that govern acoustics are actually extremely similar to the types of oscillation problems you see in spring-mass-damper systems.

The problem is the conversion of the math into mechanics. I think that their theory will be excellent, but their delivery may not be quite there yet. In other words, chances are that their mechanics will be heavy, bulky, and overly complex. But time will tell.
 

·
BYO Plastic cutlery
Joined
·
9,869 Posts
siragan said:
The reason why Bose, a seemingly unlikely candidate for suspension (being that their expertise is in the realm of acoustics), is doing so is because the physical laws that govern acoustics are actually extremely similar to the types of oscillation problems you see in spring-mass-damper systems.

The problem is the conversion of the math into mechanics. I think that their theory will be excellent, but their delivery may not be quite there yet. In other words, chances are that their mechanics will be heavy, bulky, and overly complex. But time will tell.
Just like elecric valves
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top