best BrakePad material for damaged rotors? | Ford Escort Owners Association (FEOA)

best BrakePad material for damaged rotors?

Discussion in 'Wheels/Tires/Brakes' started by Not THAT kind of 'escort', Oct 12, 2017.

  1. Not THAT kind of 'escort'

    Not THAT kind of 'escort' FEOA Donator

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    This is for my 2002 GMC Savannah 2500. Brakes making that noise, but rears look good so must be fronts and must be some decent damage, but still drives fine so I figure I'll just pad slap it.

    What material (ceramic, semi-metallic, etc) does best on brake jobs with semi raunchy rotors?
  2. neuspeedescort

    neuspeedescort Moderator Staff Member

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    best kind is replace the rotors or have them turned first. no two ways about it.
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  3. Joey_Twowagons

    Joey_Twowagons FEOA Member

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    I'd just throw on the cheapest Rockauto pads and see how it goes. When I was a youngster I had some rotors gouged up on one side that wouldn't clean up when turned on both sides (as required due to the way brake lathes operate).
    So I asked the automotive machinist what would happen if I just put on new pads without turning the rotors, and he said the pad would fairly quickly wear into the grooved pattern of the rotor. Okay, so what then? Well, it would just wear normally ever after.

    So I now consider grooves as "hi performance extra surface ridges". If the brakes work fine and without pulsing, I leave the rotors alone. If I don't consider them reusable, then I buy new ones. Having many years' experience in both automotive and regular machine shops, I have found that "turned" rotors are never turned with acceptable concentricity, i.e. if you put a dial gauge on the rotor after it has been reinstalled, it will have more run out than is acceptable by the shop manual specifications.

    If the rotors are rare and expensive, then they should be reground on a flywheel resurfacer, which produces the correct surface, can selectively grind each side, and will have much greater precision than the results obtained by turning on a brake lathe.
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  4. zzyzzx

    zzyzzx FEOA Member

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    I've NEVER turned or replaced the rotors in my 1995LX, and at 243K miles, they are still in spec thickness. I do exactly what's said above, except I took it one step further in that I have uneven break wear, so on one side, I removed pads that were 1mm thick, and put in some USED brake pads that were 6mm thick that I had saved from a previous brake pad changeout. So far it's working just fine.

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