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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, i took the half shaft out, but it pulled out of the coupler that goes into the trans, did I break the cv joint or did I do it the right way???
 

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The inner joint isnt supposed to come apart - though you havent destroyed it, you would just need to get a new 'inner boot', and reassemble the joint with new grease etc. I think the boot is the only thing holding the shaft from coming out of the inner joint housing.
But doing that boot installation isnt something I would want to try with the large diameter housing still stuck in the tranny. (I prefer working upright.)
To get the inner assembly out of the transmission on my 2nd generation Escort, I put a large screwdriver (large being about 21" long with a 3/8" square shaft) so its tip is at the location where the large inner housing necks down and meets the transaxle. With the car supported so its about a foot from the ground at the rear of the engine compartment, I have room to lie under there, holding the screwdriver at about a 60 degree angle, and yank it toward the driver's side. On my car this pops the inner part of the axle assembly out a little - if I yank violently enough. You can put the tip of the screwdriver far enough in that it may damage the outer 'lip' of the seal; so I put it in as far as I can, then withdraw it a little less than 1/4". I dont know if 3rd gen. Escorts have the same setup.
To get the inner housing all the way out, I find it helps to support the inner housing as you ask it to slide out of the splines in the differential. It may take wiggling. After all, the axle assembly is heavy-ish. When the axle comes out, some fluid may dribble out, depending on how your car is sitting. I just have a pan underneath to catch it.
When trying to remove the drivers side axle from a 2nd gen. Escort; my current technique is to 1. support the bellhousing with a jack, 2. remove the front-to-rear crossmember 3. which gives me just room to put in a shorter screwdriver (its 17" long) up at a 45 degree angle. Since there isnt as much room for a mighty swing, I hit smack the handle of the screwdriver with a hammer to make it go sideways (toward the passenger's side of the car). If you dont have the jack holding the bell housing up, you wont be able to get the crossmember back up in place. At least I cant.
I own 3 2nd gen. Escorts, and have had the axles out of the tranny on each of them. Two of them have over 200,000 miles, one has only 100,000 miles, and while its axles were okay, the car needed a clutch - hence taking the tranny out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ive tried every way of prying it out, still nothing, any other ideas. Thing is it might be jammed in there because i hit a wall pretty good and it bend the shaft thats why im replacing the whole thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No its the pass side, like i said i hit the wall pretty good with that side so i hope its not jammed in there. Ill search for therieldeal and see what i can do.
 

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Escort97Sport said:
No its the pass side, like i said i hit the wall pretty good with that side so i hope its not jammed in there. Ill search for therieldeal and see what i can do.
His advice is for getting out the one on the driver's side, not the passenger's side. I think the only way you are going to get it out is by using a special tool, which is a slide hammer with an adapter, and of that doesn't work you are going to have to take out the driver's side and knock it out from there.
 

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My epiphany for Mr. Haynes & his axle-removal team

Your manual, Mr. Haynes, has caused me much frustration over the last few days and I am writing to complain. Specifically, I take issue to the language in the "drivetrain" section of your manual that refers to the removal of drive axles from the differential/transmission as it clearly directs the user to "pry gently".

After following those directions for quite a few hours over 3 frustrating days, without success and to the dismay of several bent screwdrivers and a bent nail-bar.... I set your manual aside and consulted a group of known experts via their posts to the much undervalued online forums of the Ford Escort Owners Association (foea.net). After reviewing every post on this forum for more information about this procedure, I realized that the #1 problem most people are having (including myself) getting these axles out isn't what tool they use or where they place that tool...

MY EPIPHANY:

Only small prying forces are required to move the axle the first few millimeters outboard. This force is equal and opposite to the relatively minor friction between the splines of the axle and the splines of the differential gear.

At this point the force required to move the axle further outboard INCREASES DRAMATICALLY, as the retaining cir-clip on the inboard end of the axle is pinched between the inboard side of the differential gear and the inboard wall of the cir-clip-groove machined into the end of the axle. In the absence of substantial wear of these parts, Mr. Haynes, this is as far as you'll ever get with "gentle prying".

A LARGE ABRUPT force (i.e. impact or shock as generated by a slide hammer or a hammer blow to a "cats-paw" pry-bar) in the outboard direction is ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED to move the next few millimeters! This is the force equal and opposite to the force required to get the differential gear to begin to climb up onto the deceptively diminutive cir-clip that sits on the inboard end of the axles & to subsequently compress the clip into the recess machined into the axle.

Once the cir-clip is compressed, the outboard force required to move the axle outboard for the next inch or so is again relatively small, as it must now only overcome the friction of the spline-w/in-spline friction and a small additional amount of friction (probably negligible to uncalibrated shade-tree mechanic hands) contributed by the friction of that cir-clip sliding along the splines on the the inside diameter of the differential gear.

When the axle has been moved outboard far enough, it is possible for the circlip to expand again to it's native state in the space between the differential gear and the trans-axle bearing. (Though sometimes this does not happen if axle is moving outboard with enough inertia after the successful compression of the circlip by the differential gear and subsequent outboard movement.) The resistance force will rise dramatically again, as the circlip strikes the inboard inner-race of the bearing and a large, abrupt force will once again be required to get it compressed back into it's groove.

In this case however, the entire axle assembly can act as it's own slide hammer. Just slide the axle back into the transmission GENTLY AND DELICATELY until the circlip touches the outboard face of the differential gear (being sure not to slide it in to the point that the clip is inboard of the differential gear!) and then JERK the axle VIOLENTLY outboard.

This should result in you laying proudly on your back in a pool of transmission fluid, sweat in your eyes, black grease up to your elbows, holding the removed axle on your chest with great pride... before you realize you might have damaged the outboard CV joint by smacking it into the spindle you hung precariously from a wire where you thought it would be "out-of-the-way".

THE SUMMARY: ....WHEN THE AXLE STOPS SLIDING OUT... FORGET "GENTLY" AND HIT SOMETHING WITH A HAMMER!

In conclusion, Mr. Haynes, I would appreciate it if in the future you would trust your end users enough to follow a GOOD manual carefully to avoid collateral damage to their own property, AND TELL US UP FRONT WHAT IS REALLY REQUIRED!

Sincerely Frustrated,
 
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