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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm helping a friend w/ her 93 Wagon manual transmission w/ 1.9L. Her check engine light is coming on after a dew minutes of driving, and then stays on for the duration of the trip. I told her to stop at Autozone to get the codes (as I didn't have the time right then to short the test circuits, and I don't have a real OBD1 reader; everyone I use is post '96).

She said the Autozone readers gave:

111 11 41

Apparantly it took them a good 3 or 4 tries to get the codes down on paper :) These may be way off, if so, but supposedly they got the same codes on tries #3 and 4!

Looking at a copy of the Haynes, 111 is the OK code. There is no 11 or 41 listed in the section for the 1993 1.9L. It doesn't indicate if the 2 digits codes are still in place from the old 1991 engine model, but if so, then the 11 is again an OK indicator, and the 41 is HEGO (Heated Exhaust Gas Oxygen sensor) code.

The car runs great, shifts cleanly, and at JUST 100,227 miles, is in fairly good shape for its age.

Any ideas?

Thanks!
 

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It's not unusual for the O2 sensor to go on the Escort or any vehicle after this mileage. A faulty O2 sensor will bring in your Check Engine Light. The car may run just fine with this fault. I'm sure this is your problem.

The Escort in question has only one exhaust O2 sensor. It's located just above the catalytic converter and you can see it as soon as you pop the hood looking down from the front of the vehicle. The electrical connector is mounted on the cooling fan shroud. Can't remember the size of the wrench you'll need. As with anything on the exhaust side, it'll be difficult to get out. Soak it in penetrating oil.

It's a snap to replace; you shouldn't need to remove anything else, but it's a bit tight in there. Can't remember the cost of the part though.
 

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I'll have to do some research, but I'm reasonably sure that (on my 95 LX) that all codes are 3 digit.
 

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IIRC, 1991 and 1992 Escorts use the 2 digit codes. the 19993 to 1995 Escorts use the 3 digit codes while the 1996 is the OBD-II.


Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sensor

Well, I figure that it won't hurt to replace the O2 sensor, but before I do that, I'll just short the test circuit and kind of take the Autozone guys out of the picture :)

If I'm still getting 111 11 41 I'll let you know. Maybe the Autozone guys aren't used to OBD1 and want all the newfangled stuff *grin* Took them forever to even *find* the OBD1 reader which is never a good sign.
 

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Re: Sensor

seanmcp said:
If I'm still getting 111 11 41 I'll let you know. Maybe the Autozone guys aren't used to OBD1 and want all the newfangled stuff *grin* Took them forever to even *find* the OBD1 reader which is never a good sign.
There os more than one test to do anyway. There is one that just reads stored codes. That's probably the only one they did, and I think badly. There is another one that you do with the car running (not driving, just running the engine at idol). At times you have hit the gas pedal (getting the timing right takes several attempts) and there is a cylinder balance test which is kind of fun. Then it spits out the codes. Look up EEC-IV KOEO KOER tests.

Just read through this website:
http://www.dalidesign.com/hbook/eectest.html

Its the one I used. Don't bother with a voltmeter, it's much easier to read the codes via the flashing light, just don't do it in broad daylight. Dusk is an excellent time of the day to check the codes. If you can put it in a garage then you can do it anytime.
 
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