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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I needed a new PCV Breather Hose Elbow. Then I found out that this part has been discontinued.
"Your order CF315081 has been cancelled.
Part No.: F4CZ-6758-A
TUBE ASY
[Ford | Escort | 1995 | 4 Cyl 1.9L | 4-Speed Automatic Transmission 4EAT]"​


I replaced the elbow that had rotted through with about a 3" piece of this vacuum hose, that I purchased from Amazon.
"UTSAUTO High Performance Silicone Vacuum Hose Line, 6.6 Feet (2M), ID 0.39" (10MM), Silicone Vacuum Tubing Hose - Black"

95 Escort Wagon LX is no longer dying while trying to idle.

I am going to keep a batch of the hose in the trunk, just in case this hose degrades. I doubt that it will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I can see the T connector being a good fix. But this is very simple and functional, the hose is rated for the job heat and vacuum wise. Snip, clip and done..
 

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Yeah, I can see the T connector being a good fix. But this is very simple and functional, the hose is rated for the job heat and vacuum wise. Snip, clip and done..
Often the parts stores will hand people windshield washer fluid line when they need vacuum line. Happened to me but I caught it after getting back home and reading "1.0 bar" on the section of hose. Regular vacuum line will do for that; but it must be vacuum line and not windshield washer line.

Way back I had a section of hose to the DPFE sensor fail. It allowed the ECU to read exhaust pulses. I replaced it with vacuum line but the exhaust soon dry-rotted it. It was as hard and brittle as a torched hotdog wiener. Longer story short, the only thing that was cut-out for the job was... (drum roll)... FUEL LINE. Cut and installed the fuel line and had not another issue for the next several years until the Rusty Reaper finished compromising the body.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Often the parts stores will hand people windshield washer fluid line when they need vacuum line. Happened to me but I caught it after getting back home and reading "1.0 bar" on the section of hose. Regular vacuum line will do for that; but it must be vacuum line and not windshield washer line.

Way back I had a section of hose to the DPFE sensor fail. It allowed the ECU to read exhaust pulses. I replaced it with vacuum line but the exhaust soon dry-rotted it. It was as hard and brittle as a torched hotdog wiener. Longer story short, the only thing that was cut-out for the job was... (drum roll)... FUEL LINE. Cut and installed the fuel line and had not another issue for the next several years until the Rusty Reaper finished compromising the body.
Yes, that is why my post talks very specifically about "High Performance Silicone Vacuum Hose Line ". Luckily, if someone sells you something else, when you are specifically asking for "High Performance Silicone Vacuum Hose Line ", you can get your money back and buy the right thing.
 

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Interestingly, what caused the original DPFE sensor hose to fail was elevated back-pressure in the exhaust system. That was caused by a clogged catalytic converter. What caused the cat to clog, was running too cold. What caused it to run too cold, was a failed bypass valve in the thermostat housing.

Also, many people make the mistake of replacing the OEM PCV thinking it was spring-operated like most of the designs. In reality it was merely gravity operated. So it was pretty much maintenance-free. At most it might need to be cleaned up a little. Of course once they were replaced... then yeah, nothing but issues and periodic maintenance thereafter...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interestingly, what caused the original DPFE sensor hose to fail was elevated back-pressure in the exhaust system. That was caused by a clogged catalytic converter. What caused the cat to clog, was running too cold. What caused it to run too cold, was a failed bypass valve in the thermostat housing.

Also, many people make the mistake of replacing the OEM PCV thinking it was spring-operated like most of the designs. In reality it was merely gravity operated. So it was pretty much maintenance-free. At most it might need to be cleaned up a little. Of course once they were replaced... then yeah, nothing but issues and periodic maintenance thereafter...
Wow.. Great information :D I am just working around a discontinued part :D Thanks..
 

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Good insight into the PCV valve, Intuit. Luckily I always try to keep, clean or repair the original parts and still have my original installed. I did swap in a replacement one once when I was having issues, and it really caused the idle to be poor.

So I cleaned and reused the original and idle etc. is fine now.
 
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